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  1. #1
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    First question: I am yet to come upon any decent pathways or mechanisms by which phosphatidylserine exerts its mood-elevating and cortisol/ACTH-lowering effects. Any speculations or ideas?



    Question B: Would lecithin/phosphatidylcholine supplementation negate phosphatidylserine supplementing? I am fairly sure that the net phospholipid content of our body's doesn't increase when supplementing PS. I have been assuming that PS supplementation alters the phospholipid membrane composition; thus supplementating any other phospholipid would induce less overall PS incorporation...?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tatsuo' date='Jan 16 2004, 07:27 PM
    First question:* I am yet to come upon any decent pathways or mechanisms by which phosphatidylserine exerts its mood-elevating and cortisol/ACTH-lowering effects.* Any speculations or ideas?



    Question B: Would lecithin/phosphatidylcholine supplementation negate phosphatidylserine supplementing?* I am fairly sure that the net phospholipid content of our body's doesn't increase when supplementing PS.* I have been assuming that PS supplementation alters the phospholipid membrane composition; thus supplementating any other phospholipid would induce less overall PS incorporation...?
    I will type what I know regarding the metabolism of the nonessential amino acid "serine". This should help answer some of your questions...



    Serine is derived from the amino acid glycine by the the enzyme serine hydroxymethyl transferase - this enzyme uses vitamin B6, B3, and folic acid.



    Serine is a key metabolite of ethanolamine, choline, sarcosine, and phospholipids. After conversion to glycine, serine is metabolized to amino levulinic acid - which is a precursor of porphyrins and hemoglobin. Serine is also metabolized into to pyruvate. Serine metabolism is ultimately dependent on the amounts of folic acid and methionine in the brain. Serine is available from protein foods by conversion from glycine and also via glycolysis from phosphoglycerate.



    Serine levels in plasma increase with the severity of phychosis. The antibiotic cycloserine inhibits vit.B6 and serine metabolism and has been associated with psychosis in ~5-10% of people. The antipsychotic drug chlorpromazine is known to inhibit serine metabolism. PS is converted into phosphatidylcholine via Vitamin B6. PS can enhance the effects of opiates by increasing opiate binding to neurons. Excess serine tends to antagonize the effects of cysteine.



    I'm not sure how PS supplementation suppresses cortisol, but the "mood-boosting" effects taken to the extreme may perhaps resemble psychosis or altered glycine metabolism? Glycine has been helpful for calming manic-psychotic individuals in many instances.



    Hope this helps somewhat...



    PS (phosphatidylserine) is the precursor of phospholipids.
    ".. I imagine him (Ergoman) as either some neo monk who has such a perfect balance with his body that he notices even the slightest difference from something..."..."Or he's a sup company rep with the worst computer skills I've ever seen... maybe he's playing dumb to trick us..."-Supnut

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    Unfortunately, "lecithin" means different things to different people. This is at the root of much of the confusion regarding the mechanisms of action of choline and phospholipid supplementation...





    Most of this is over my head, but perhaps you may find some references that may be of use to you. Unfortunately most of what I found was research using animals. Hope this helps!



    Zanotti, A., Valzelli, L. & Toffano, G. (1989) Chronic phosphatidylserine treatment improves spatial memory and passive avoidance in aged rats. Psychopharmacology 99:316-321.



    Delwaide, P. J., Gyselynck-Mambourg, A. M., Hurlet, A. & Ylieff, M. (1986) Double-blind randomized controlled study of phosphatidylserine in senile demented patients. Acta Neurol. Scand. 73:136-140.



    Cenacchi, T., Bertoldin, T., Farina, C., Fiori, M. G. & Crepaldi, G., participating investigators (1993) Cognitive decline in the elderly: a double-blind, placebo-controlled multicenter study on efficacy of phosphatidylserine administration. Aging Clin. Exp. Res. 5:123-133.



    Furushiro, M., Suzuki, S., Shishido, Y., Sakai, M., Yamatoya, H., Kudo, S., Hashimoto, S. & Yokokura, T. (1997) Effects of oral administration of soybean lecithin transphosphatidylated phosphatidylserine on impaired learning of passive avoidance in mice. Jpn. J. Pharmacol. 75:447-450.



    Suzuki, S., Furushiro, M., Takahashi, M., Sakai, M. & Kudo, S. (1999) Oral administration of soybean lecithin transphosphatidylated phosphatidylserine (SB-tPS) reduces ischemic damage in the gerbil hippocampus. Jpn. J. Pharmacol. 81:237-239.



    Tanaka, Y., Hasegawa, A. & Ando, S. (1996) Impaired synaptic functions with aging as characterized by decreased calcium influx and acetylcholine release. J. Neurosci. Res. 43:63-70.



    Blockland, A., Honig, W., Brouns, F. & Jolles, J. (1999) Cognition-enhancing properties of subchronic phosphatidylserine (PS) treatment in middle-aged rats: comparison of bovine cortex PS with egg PS and soybean PS. Nutrition 15:778-783.



    Casamenti, F., Scali, C. & Pepeu, G. (1991) Phosphatidylserine reverses the age-dependent decrease in cortical acetylcholine release: a microdialysis study. Eur. J. Pharmacol. 194:11-16.



    Yamatoya, H., Sakai, M. & Kudo, S. (2000) The effects of soybean transphosphatidylated phosphatidylserine on cholinergic synaptic functions of mice. Jpn. J. Pharmacol. 84:93-96.



    Tanaka, Y. & Ando, S. (1990) Synaptic aging as revealed by changes in membrane potential and decreased activity of Na+, K+-ATPase. Brain Res 506:46-52.
    ".. I imagine him (Ergoman) as either some neo monk who has such a perfect balance with his body that he notices even the slightest difference from something..."..."Or he's a sup company rep with the worst computer skills I've ever seen... maybe he's playing dumb to trick us..."-Supnut

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    Why was ergoman500 banned?
    <span style="color:#FF0000">Latest tube recs</span>: <span style="color:#0000FF">TP?</span> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5-i1cJh7L6I
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    I wasn't that I am aware of...just not able to log in for a few months -so I quit trying to login...Finally I was able to login and the name was to be "Ergoman"...is what I was told...
    ".. I imagine him (Ergoman) as either some neo monk who has such a perfect balance with his body that he notices even the slightest difference from something..."..."Or he's a sup company rep with the worst computer skills I've ever seen... maybe he's playing dumb to trick us..."-Supnut

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    Senior Member Benson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by methodice View Post
    Why was ergoman500 banned?
    He wasn't.
    Remember, believe none of what you hear and half of what you see...





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    Hmmmm ... I'm going to have to think about that one

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    Quote Originally Posted by julyaric720 View Post
    Hmmmm ... I'm going to have to think about that one
    why is that
    ".. I imagine him (Ergoman) as either some neo monk who has such a perfect balance with his body that he notices even the slightest difference from something..."..."Or he's a sup company rep with the worst computer skills I've ever seen... maybe he's playing dumb to trick us..."-Supnut

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