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  1. #1
    Senior Member MeDieViL's Avatar
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    Default Fuck valerian, hop, passionflower and other cowfood, magnolia and mulungu is where it

    2-4 capsules Magnolia bark (buy "Hou Po" which is Chinese magnolia bark granules used to make an herbal tea) The granules are small enough to cap yourself and you can get 100 grams for $25 with shipping. Each self capped capsule holds like 450 mg or so, so thats 3-6 months worth. Look up some studies on GABA receptor sensitivity and honokiol, the active compound. I have found it can double the effects of phenibut (truly, i have tried this with others and they agree). The studies were done with rats using muscimol, another GABA agonist. They quoted 2 to 5 times potentiation i think. My brother said he noticed a 75% increase, for me it is a doubling effect. This is also i belive the strongest herbal anti-cortisol aid available besides 7-OH, which i have not tried due to cost. There is also Bacopa, but from what i've read of peoples experiences magnolia bark beats bacopa hands down in Cushing's Syndrome support boards.
    [QUOTE]Honokiol and GABA:
    Phytomedicine. 2011 May 9. [Epub ahead of print]
    Effect of honokiol on activity of GAD(65) and GAD(67) in the cortex and hippocampus of mice.
    Ku TH, Lee YJ, Wang SJ, Fan CH, Tien LT.
    Source
    Department of Anesthesiology, Changhua Christian Hospital, Changhua County 500, Taiwan.
    Abstract
    Honokiol, an active agent extracted from magnolia bark, has been reported that induces anxiolytic action in a mouse elevated plus-maze test. However, the mechanism of anxiolytic action induced by honokiol remains unclear. This study was to investigate the change in two forms of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GABA synthesized enzymes) GAD(65) and GAD(67) in the cortex and hippocampus areas while the anxiolytic actions induced by chronic administration of honokiol in mice. Mice treated with 7 daily injection of honokiol (1mg/kg, p.o.) caused anxiolytic action which was similar to that was induced by 7 daily injection of diazepam (2mg/kg, p.o.) in the elevated plus-maze test. In addition, the activity of hippocampal GAD(65) of honokiol treated mice was significantly increased than that of the vehicle or diazepam treated groups. These data suggest that honokiol causes diazepam-like anxiolytic action, which may be mediated by altering the synthesis of GABA in the brain of mice.
    One
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  2. #2
    Senior Member MeDieViL's Avatar
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    Honokiol and magnolol selectively interact with GABAA receptor subtypes in vitro.
    Ai J, Wang X, Nielsen M.
    Source
    Department of Psychopharmacology, Research Institute of Biological Psychiatry, St. Hans Hospital, Roskilde, Denmark. jinglu.ai@sickkids.on.ca
    Abstract
    Honokiol and magnolol have been identified as modulators of the GABAA receptors in vitro. Our previous study suggested a possible selectivity of honokiol and magnolol on GABAA receptor subtypes. This possibility was examined in the current study by 3H-muscimol and 3H-flunitrazepam binding assays on various rat brain membrane preparations and human recombinant GABA(A) receptor subunit combinations expressed by the Sf-9/baculovirus system. Generally, honokiol and magnolol have a similar enhancing effect on (3)H-muscimol binding to various membrane preparations in nonsaturation binding assays. Honokiol and magnolol preferentially increased (3)H-muscimol binding to hippocampus compared to cortex and cerebellum (with a maximum enhancement of 400% of control). As for subunit combinations, honokiol and magnolol have a more potent enhancing effect on alpha2 subunit containing combinations (with a maximum enhancement of 400-450% of control). This action was independent of the gamma subunit. In saturation binding assays, magnolol affected either the number of binding sites (ca. 4-fold on alpha2 containing combinations) or the binding affinity (on alpha1 containing combinations) of (3)H-muscimol binding to various GABAA receptor subunit combinations. In contrast, honokiol increased only binding sites on alpha2beta3gamma2s and alpha2beta3 combinations, but both the number of binding sites and the binding affinity on alpha1beta2gamma2S and alpha(1)beta2 combinations. These results indicate that honokiol and magnolol have some selectivity on different GABAA receptor subtypes. The property of interacting with GABAA receptors and their selectivity could be responsible for the reported in vivo effects of these two compounds.
    [QUOTE]
    Br J Pharmacol. 2011 Apr 26. doi: 10.1111/j.1476-5381.2011.01456.x. [Epub ahead of print]
    Magnolol, a major bioactive constituent of the bark of Magnolia officinalis, exerts anti-epileptic effects via GABA-benzodiazepine receptor complex in mice.
    Chen C, Tan R, Qu W, Wu Z, Wang Y, Urade Y, Huang Z.
    Source
    Department of Pharmacology; State Key Laboratory of Medical Neurobiology, Shanghai Medical College, Institute of Brain Science, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200032, China; Department of Molecular Behavioral Biology, Osaka Bioscience Institute, 6-2-4 Furuedai, Suita, Osaka 565-0874, Japan.
    Abstract
    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-seizure effect of magnolol (6, 6', 7, 12-Tetramethoxy-2, 2'-dimethyl-1-beta-berbaman, C(18) H(18) O(2) ) and mechanisms involved. Experimental approach: Mice were treated with magnolol (20, 40 and 80 mg/kg) 30 min before the injection with pentylenetetrazol (PTZ, 60 mg/kg, i.p). The anti-seizure effects of magnolol were analyzed using seizure models of behaviour, electroencephalographic (EEG) and in vitro electrophysiology, and c-Fos expression in the hippocampus and cortex. Key results: Magnolol at doses of 40 and 80 mg/kg significantly delayed the onset of myoclonic jerks and generalized clonic seizures, and decreased the seizure stage and mortality compared with those of the vehicle-treated animals. EEG recordings showed that magnolol at 40, 80 mg/kg prolonged the latency of seizure onset and decreased the number of seizure spikes. The anti-epileptic effect of magnolol was reversed by the GABA(A) /benzodiazepine receptor antagonist flumazenil. Pretreatment with flumazenil decreased the effects of magnolol on prolongation of seizure latency and decline of seizure stage. In a Mg(2+) -free model of epileptiform activity via multi-electrode array recordings in mouse hippocampal slices, magnolol decreased spontaneous epileptiform discharges. Magnolol also significantly decreased seizure-induced Fos immunoreactivity in the piriform cortex, dentate gyrus, and hippocampal area CA1. These effects were attenuated by pretreatment with flumazenil. Conclusions and implications: These findings indicate that the inhibitory effects of magnolol on the epileptiform activity were mediated by the GABA(A) /benzodiazepine receptor complex.

    © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.
    Phytother Res. 2009 Sep;23(9):1340-4.
    Magnolol enhances pentobarbital-induced sleeping behaviors: possible involvement of GABAergic systems.
    Ma H, Kim CS, Ma Y, Nam SY, Kim DS, Woo SS, Hong JT, Oh KW.
    Source
    College of Pharmacy, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, 361-763, Korea.
    Abstract
    This study was performed to investigate whether magnolol enhances pentobarbital-induced sleeping behaviors through the GABAergic systems. Magnolol prolonged the sleeping time induced by pentobarbital. In addition, magnolol increased chloride influx in primary cultured cerebellar granule cells. The expression of the GABA(A) receptor alpha-subunit was increased selectively by magnolol, but magnolol had no effect on the abundance of beta- or gamma-subunits. The expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) was not influenced by magnolol. It is suggested that magnolol may enhance pentobarbital-induced sleeping behaviors through the activation of GABAergic systems.
    One
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  3. #3
    Senior Member MeDieViL's Avatar
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    Honokiol and magnolol increase the number of [3H] muscimol binding sites three-fold in rat forebrain membranes in vitro using a filtration assay, by allosterically increasing the affinities of low-affinity sites.
    Squires RF, Ai J, Witt MR, Kahnberg P, Saederup E, Sterner O, Nielsen M.
    Source
    Center for Neurochemistry, The Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research Orangeburg, NY 10962, USA. lajtha@nki.rfmh.org
    Abstract
    1. The bark of the root and stem of various Magnolia species has been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine to treat a variety of disorders including anxiety and nervous disturbances. The biphenolic compounds honokiol (H) and magnolol (M), the main components of the Chinese medicinal plant Magnolia officinalis, interact with GABA(A) receptors in rat brain in vitro. We compared the effects of H and M on [3H]muscimol (MUS) and [3H]flunitrazepam (FNM) binding using EDTA/water dialyzed rat brain membranes in a buffer containing 150 mM NaCl plus 5 mM Tris-HCl, pH 7.5 as well as [35S]t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS) in 200 mM KBr plus 5 mM Tris-HCl, pH 7.5. H and M had similar enhancing effects on [3H]MUS as well as on [3H]FNM binding to rat brain membrane preparations, but H was 2.5 to 5.2 times more potent than M. 2. [3H]FNM binding. GABA alone almost doubled [3H]FNM binding with EC50 = 450 nM and 200 nM using forebrain and cerebellar membranes, respectively. In the presence of 5 microM H or M the EC50 values for GABA were decreased to 79 and 89 nM, respectively, using forebrain, and 39 and 78 nM, using cerebellar membranes. H and M potently enhanced the potentiating effect of 200 nM GABA on [3H]FNM binding with EC50 values of 0.61 microM and 1.6 microM using forebrain membranes, with maximal enhancements of 33 and 47%, respectively. Using cerebellar membranes, the corresponding values were 0.25 and 1.1 microM, and 22 and 34%. 3. [3H]MUS binding. H and M increased [3H]MUS binding to whole forebrain membranes about 3-fold with EC50 values of 6.0 and 15 microM. Using cerebellar membranes, H and M increased [3H]MUS binding approximately 68% with EC50 values of 2.3 and 12 microM, respectively. Scatchard analysis revealed that the enhancements of [3H]MUS binding were due primarily to increases in the number of binding sites (Bmax values) with no effect on the high affinity binding constants (Kd values). The enhancing effect of H and M were not additive. 4. [35S]TBPS binding. H and M displaced [35S]TBPS binding from sites on whole rat forebrain membranes with IC50 values of 7.8 and 6.0 microM, respectively. Using cerebellar membranes, the corresponding IC50 values were 5.3 and 4.8 microM. These inhibitory effects were reversed by the potent GABA(A) receptor blocker R5135 (10 nM), suggesting that H and M allosterically increase the affinity of GABA(A) receptors for GABA and MUS by binding to sites in GABA(A) receptor complexes. 5. Two monophenols, the anesthetic propofol (2,6-diisopropylphenol, P) and the anti-inflammatory diflunisal (2',4'-difluoro-4-hydroxy-3-biphenyl carboxylic acid, D) also enhanced [3H]MUS binding, decreased the EC50 values for GABA in enhancing [3H]FNM binding and potentiated the enhancing effect of 200 nM GABA on [3H]FNM binding, although enhancements of [3H]MUS binding for these monophenols were smaller than those for H and M, using forebrain and cerebellar membranes. The enhancing effect of P and D on [3H]MUS binding were almost completely additive. 2,2'-biphenol was inactive on [3H]MUS and [3H]FNM binding. These, and other preliminary experiments, suggest that appropriate ortho (C2) and para (C4) substitution increases the GABA-potentiating activity of phenols. 6. The potentiation of GABAergic neurotransmission by H and M is probably involved in their previously reported anxiolytic and central depressant effects.
    Reports:
    My favourite scientist has informed me that he found Honokiol isolated from Magnolia taken at the 300-500mg range is very relaxing. Effects seemed to build from 300mg and become very noticeable at 500mg, including anxiolytic properties similar to certain pharmaceuticals, some minor loss of inhibition, and moderate sedation leading to comfortable sleep.

    More effective by far than Valerian for him (which did close to nothing numerous trials), but definitely not "intoxicating". He says he sees Honokiol as a very nice "supporter", but would not choose it for any recreational purpose, as such.

    This has been repeated a few times without noticeable tolerance. Quite good to have on hand if you're prone to anxiety/panic/insomnia!
    One
    Exceeding, going further, crossing boundery's, taking risks greater then most, next level.

  4. #4
    Senior Member MeDieViL's Avatar
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    LF Martin, R Freedman

    In addition to the devastating symptoms of psychosis, many people with schizophrenia also suffer from cognitive impairment. These cognitive symptoms lead to marked dysfunction and can impact employability, treatment adherence, and social skills. Deficits in P50 auditory gating are associated with attentional impairment and may contribute to cognitive symptoms and perceptual disturbances. This nicotinic cholinergic-mediated inhibitory process represents a potential new target for therapeutic intervention in schizophrenia. This chapter will review evidence implicating the nicotinic cholinergic, and specifically, the alpha7 nicotinic receptor system in the pathology of schizophrenia. Impaired auditory sensory gating has been linked to the alpha7 nicotinic receptor gene on the chromosome 15q14 locus. A majority of persons with schizophrenia are heavy smokers. Although nicotine can acutely reverse diminished auditory sensory gating in people with schizophrenia, this effect is lost on a chronic basis due to receptor desensitization. The alpha7 nicotinic agonist 3-(2,4 dimethoxy)benzylidene-anabaseine (DMXBA) can also enhance auditory sensory gating in animal models. DMXBA is well tolerated in humans and a new study in persons with schizophrenia has found that DMXBA enhances both P50 auditory gating and cognition. alpha7 Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists appear to be viable candidates for the treatment of cognitive disturbances in schizophrenia.[/QUOTE]
    Psychiatry Res. 2011 May 31. [Epub ahead of print]
    Varenicline prevents affective and cognitive exacerbation during smoking abstinence in male patients with schizophrenia.
    Liu ME, Tsai SJ, Jeang SY, Peng SL, Wu SL, Chen MC, Tsai YL, Yang ST.
    Source
    Department of Psychiatry, Long Cyuan Veterans Hospital, Pingtung, Taiwan.
    Abstract
    To explore the effects of varenicline on the psychopathology and cognition of chronic inpatients with schizophrenia, we conducted a non-randomized control group time series investigation between March 2009 and April 2010. In a mandatory smoking cessation intervention, 41 male inpatient smokers were scheduled to undergo either a five-week varenicline treatment (varenicline group) or the use of no drugs (non-treatment group). Depression (HAM-D), anxiety (HAM-A), and psychosis (PANSS) were evaluated at baseline, and at the 2nd, 4th, 8th and 12th week after abstinence; four neuropsychological tests, including Digit Span Forward and Backward (DSF and DSB), and Trail Making Test-A and -B, were evaluated at baseline and at the 4th, 8th and 12th week. .Thirty patients completed the study. Among 15 patients in the non-treatment group, the HAM-D, HAM-A, DSF, and DSB scores were exacerbated during the 2-8weeks of abstinence, but there were no changes in psychotic symptoms and the other two neuropsychological tests. Compared with the non-treatment group, varenicline users experienced less impairment in HAM-D and HAM-A scores at the 2nd and 4th weeks, and in DSF tasks at the 4th week after abstinence. In conclusions, varenicline can attenuate abstinence-induced adverse outcomes and appears to be well-tolerated in smokers with schizophrenia.

    Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Neuropsychopharmacology. 2011 Jun;36(7):1366-74. Epub 2011 Mar 2.
    Selective α(4)β(2) Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Agonists Target Epigenetic Mechanisms in Cortical GABAergic Neurons.
    Maloku E, Kadriu B, Zhubi A, Dong E, Pibiri F, Satta R, Guidotti A.
    Source
    The Psychiatric Institute, Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Abstract
    Nicotine improves cognitive performance and attention in both experimental animals and in human subjects, including patients affected by neuropsychiatric disorders. However, the specific molecular mechanisms underlying nicotine-induced behavioral changes remain unclear. We have recently shown in mice that repeated injections of nicotine, which achieve plasma concentrations comparable to those reported in high cigarette smokers, result in an epigenetically induced increase of glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD(67)) expression. Here we explored the impact of synthetic α(4)β(2) and α(7) nAChR agonists on GABAergic epigenetic parameters. Varenicline (VAR), a high-affinity partial agonist at α(4)β(2) and a lower affinity full agonist at α(7) neuronal nAChR, injected in doses of 1-5 mg/kg/s.c. twice daily for 5 days, elicited a 30-40% decrease of cortical DNA methyltransferase (DNMT)1 mRNA and an increased expression of GAD(67) mRNA and protein. This upregulation of GAD(67) was abolished by the nAChR antagonist mecamylamine. Furthermore, the level of MeCP(2) binding to GAD(67) promoters was significantly reduced following VAR administration. This effect was abolished when VAR was administered with mecamylamine. Similar effects on cortical DNMT1 and GAD(67) expression were obtained after administration of A-85380, an agonist that binds to α(4)β(2) but has negligible affinity for α(3)β(4) or α(7) subtypes containing nAChR. In contrast, PNU-282987, an agonist of the homomeric α(7) nAChR, failed to decrease cortical DNMT1 mRNA or to induce GAD(67) expression. The present study suggests that the α(4)β(2) nAChR agonists may be better suited to control the epigenetic alterations of GABAergic neurons in schizophrenia than the α(7) nAChR agonists.
    Effect of Erythrina velutina and Erythrina mulungu in rats submitted to animal models of anxiety and depression

    Erythrina velutina (EV) and Erythrina mulungu (EM), popularly used in Brazil as tranquilizing agents, were studied. The effects of acute and chronic oral treatment with a water:alcohol extract of EV (7:3, plant grounded stem bark; acute = 100, 200, 400 mg/kg; chronic = 50, 100, 200 mg/kg) were evaluated in rats (N = 11-12) submitted to the elevated T-maze (for avoidance and escape measurements) model of anxiety. This model was selected for its presumed capacity to elicit specific subtypes of anxiety disorders recognized in clinical practice: avoidance has been related to generalized anxiety and escape to panic. Additionally, animals were treated with the same doses of EV and EM (water:alcohol 7:3, inflorescence extract) and submitted to the forced swim test for the evaluation of antidepressant activity (N = 7-10). Both treatment regimens with EV impaired elevated T-maze avoidance latencies, without altering escape, in a way similar to the reference drug diazepam (avoidance 1, mean ± SEM, acute study: 131.1 ± 45.5 (control), 9.0 ± 3.3 (diazepam), 12.7 ± 2.9 (200 mg/kg), 28.8 ± 15.3 (400 mg/kg); chronic study: 131.7 ± 46.9 (control), 35.8 ± 29.7 (diazepam), 24.4 ± 10.4 (50 mg/kg), 29.7 ± 11.5 (200 mg/kg)). Neither EV nor EM altered measurements performed in the forced swim test, in contrast to the reference drug imipramine that significantly decreased immobility time after chronic treatment. These results were not due to motor alterations since no significant effects were detected in an open field. These observations suggest that EV exerts anxiolytic-like effects on a specific subset of defensive behaviors which have been associated with generalized anxiety disorder.




    Central activity of hydroalcoholic extracts from Erythrina velutina and Erythrina mulungu in mice

    This work studied the central behavioural effects of hydroalcoholic extracts from the stem bark of Erythrina velutina and Erythrina mulungu on the elevated plus maze, open field, and rota rod tests in mice. These medicinal plants belong to the Fabaceae family and are popularly used in Brazil for their effects on the central nervous system. Single doses of the extracts were administered orally (200, 400 or 800 mg kg-1) or intraperitoneally (200 or 400 mg kg-1) to female mice. A reduction of the locomotor activity was observed in the open field test with both hydroalcoholic extracts after intraperitoneal treatment with all doses, but only with the highest dose after oral administration. In addition, oral and intraperitoneal administration of the extracts decreased the incidence of rearing and grooming. Decreases in the number of entries in the open (NEOA) and closed (NECA) arms of the elevated plus maze were observed after the administration of the highest dose (800 mg kg-1, p.o.) of both hydroalcoholic extracts, and this effect may be due to the decrease in locomotor activity. These hydroalcoholic extracts failed to affect the motor coordination in the rota rod test. In conclusion, we showed that the hydroalcoholic extracts of E. velutina and E. mulungu have depressant effects on the central nervous system, which, at least partially, corroborates the popular use of these species as tranquilizers in Brazilian popular medicine.

    Read more: Experiences - Experiences With Mulungu (Erythrina mulungu) - Drugs Forum

    So it appears they also might potentiate the action of GABAB agonists according to that one promosing report.[/QUOTE]
    One
    Exceeding, going further, crossing boundery's, taking risks greater then most, next level.

  5. #5
    Senior Member MeDieViL's Avatar
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    The Mulungu 90% is still one of the best extracts available in my opinion.

    I will try and scrounge up some notes but what you are seemingly interested in alkahest has been what most of my own personal research has been about. I also have spinal issues amongst other things. haha

    Mulungu 90% is GREAT but it takes 'Doug' around 20-30 grams in decoction(crock pot on low for a few hours) form. Strain, cool and slam down. Make sure to strain well, as this stuff gives gut rot like no other. And 'Doug' can T&W just about any whole plant material. Also found that the 'whole' pieces seem 'better' in some way, maybe its that the powder is so very hard to deal with.[/QUOTE]
    My friend first tried 5 grams in a tea and worked up to 8-10 grams.
    For him it was strange, not so much muscle relaxation and soothing feelings, more of just an overwhelming desire to go to sleep. So this is what he uses it for; he usually places all he powdered bark in a tea filter and boils it covered in a pot for 20-30 mins. Cools it a bit and drinks.
    As for combinations my friend mentions that you should treat it like a mild/moderate benzodiazepine. He mentions having it after an evening of mushrooms as well as edit, he says that he didn't notice any ill effects.
    I hope this helps a bit, let me know how it goes for your friend.
    Peace
    well swim did, he started with a pretty small dose and didnt feel anything .. or nothing noticeable.. its not like he has unlimited amounts of that stuff and doesnt seem to have any allergic or similar reactions to it.


    Read more: Experiences - Experiences With Mulungu (Erythrina mulungu) - Drugs Forum
    swIm has become quite familiar with Mulungu since this thread.

    Mulungu can act as a very strong sedative thus makes it quite a valuable and effective aid for an array of ailments, ranging from certain degrees of anxiety to moderate insomnia.

    swIm have tried both shredded bark and resin, and would prefer the shredded bark since it is much more cost effective - if anything make your own resin with the shredded bark it's cheaper.

    Mulungu has such a pleasant taste as well. When mixed with honey, it makes for a nice cup of tea.

    A friend of mine likes to prepare his Mulungu tea the following way:

    Dosage depends on the individual and what he/she is trying to achieve, whether it be, sleep, slight relaxation, ease anxiety... so basically trial and error is bound until you find your ideal dosage.

    10grams (relaxtion / sleep aid) of shredded bark.. brought to a slight boil and then left to simmer (covered) for 45-60mins.
    My friend has found the longer you simmer the better, since more alkaloids release and result in a stonger tea. I have also read some save the strained bark to re-use, my friend however has yet to try that.

    The effect of Mulungu come on pretty quick. After the first two or three mouthfuls a sense of relaxation is felt. Within 15-25mins the experience has pretty much peaked and a definite sense of tranquility is awaken. Very meditative, and mellow - complete loss of anxiety, calm nerves and mental chatter.

    Mulungu @ the appropriate dosage can be very ideal for those looking for a natural sleep aid.

    Aside from it's unique/pleasurable effect; Mulungu is known to kill bacteria and is said to be rewarding to the liver as well, making Mulungu very beneficial.

    There are certain precautions however that one should be aware, for instance, one should abstain from operating anything that could potentially cause harm to oneself or another; such as driving. The reason being is that Mulungu affects coordination to some extent and the higher the dose the more obvious/apparent it is.

    .peace.


    Read more: Experiences - Experiences With Mulungu (Erythrina mulungu) - Drugs Forum
    Sorry, but I have to disagree with you there BrooklynBoy87. My swim never had much luck with mulungu, but it depends what you're after. If you want insomnia of lower duration, then this might be ok for you.
    But if you want a valium type sleeping bark, this ain't it. It won't send you off to sleep or mellowland if the time's not right, in my opinion. It will only take away the excess tension and psychic anxiety that is unhealthy, but it will not take you back down below baseline to a state that is dopier or more sedated than before.

    I'm just trying to tell you all the truth. I went through a "phase" where every new ethnobotanical that I heard of intrigued me, especially if it was mysterious with tantalising little rumours about it.

    I think the only value of mulungu is to keep on hand behind the kava. 100 times out of 100, you will always prefer to use the kava rather than the mulungu, it is the human way, because most people want to get high, they don't really want something that is so legitimate and proper that they can barely even notice it working.

    So, keep the mulungu on hand for when all the good stuff runs out, that's what I say.
    It's so boring and unappealing that you will never use it up faster than the other stuff.
    Think of it as a backup, a second line of defense.

    I will agree with Brooklyn boy that the taste is quite nice, though.


    Read more: Experiences - Experiences With Mulungu (Erythrina mulungu) - Drugs Forum
    my little green monster has used the shredded bark in tea numerous times to help after a big night. It doesnt put you to sleep but slows down all your thoughts etc so making sleep very easy.

    a friend once was having a really unpleasant trip in BZP/TFMPP and need to abort - after drinking mulungu tea the friend was much more at ease... Possibly placebo and power of suggestion, either way it worked at the time.


    Read more: Experiences - Experiences With Mulungu (Erythrina mulungu) - Drugs Forum
    Yes, it's totally different. I think it works as an anxiolytic antidepressent myself. None of that "hain't tha foggiest" that you get with benzos. This is just a much more clear headed, very very mild thing that won't knock you flat.
    To me, if it does anything at all, I would liken it to tryptophan maybe, just an uplift mellow, not a downer at all.

    Certainly less harmful than benzos.


    Read more: Experiences - Experiences With Mulungu (Erythrina mulungu) - Drugs Forum
    TRIP Report #1

    ROI: 0.5g 90% Alkaloid resin, rolled in a joint with tobacco and smoked

    Effect: Effect was pretty instantanious, mild sedation, relaxation, no noticeable euphoria, anxiolytic properties, slight reduction in motor coordination,no real anti-depressant effect, seemed to last around 1 hour.

    Conclusion: No real recreational value but definite anxiolytic effect.

    TRIP Report #2

    ROI: 1g of 90% Alkaloid resin added to hot water with a little honey and imbibed

    Effect: Effects where noticeable at T+20. Quite powerful sedation and relaxation, mild euphoria, strong anxiolytic properties, reduction in motor coordination, greater clarity of mind opposed to smoking, no real anti-depressant effect or mild at best. Effects are ongoing.

    Conclusion: SWIM still wouldnt say that it had massive recreational value, as others have said SWIM would liken it to 10mg of Valium and certainly recommends that fellow anxiety sufferers give it a try. It wont be pulling SWIM away from Kratom, but it will be held as an addition and used as needed rather than recreationally.

    Read more: Experiences - Experiences With Mulungu (Erythrina mulungu) - Drugs Forum
    My friend decided to give this a try. She's 5'3", 110lbs-ish, 30 years old. Suffers depression, bipolar, anxiety, social anxiety. Particularly bad anxiety going into this trip.

    Recipe: Two tablespoons of Mulungu into 1.25 cups of boiling water. Covered and boiled about two minutes. Didn't smell so tasty so she tossed in a bit of sugar. (She's a tnw-er, not a tea drinker.) Took off heat, still covered, and steeped about three minutes. Found a kitchen instrument that she finally realized was made just for this sort of thing (awesome), strained big pieces out to make about 3/4 a cup of tea (a little left in saucepan). Let tea cool about two minutes and then she put a piece of ice in her cup to speed things up. (She's an impatient lass.)

    She says:
    5:18- First sip, actually tastes very cinnamon-y. Not as bad as expected (though not very good either). Kinda like dirty, cinnamon-y steeped twigs.
    5:20- Just downed it. (She's making funny faces now.)

    5:38- Been twenty minutes... possibly some reduction in anxiety.

    5:53- Downed the rest of the tea about seven minutes ago. Definitely thinking there's some reduction in anxiety beyond placebo effect. Not really something recreational at this level (although perhaps higher?), but definitely something to work with some more in terms of anxiety. She'd agree that it feels like the equivalent of around 5-10mg of valium.

    5:57- She just read over this report. That "bad anxiety" she mentioned isn't really there anymore.

    Anyone know of any negative (or positive) effects from using daily or several times a week?


    Read more: Experiences - Experiences With Mulungu (Erythrina mulungu) - Drugs Forum
    One
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  6. #6
    Senior Member MeDieViL's Avatar
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    The Mulungu 90% is still one of the best extracts available in my opinion.

    I will try and scrounge up some notes but what you are seemingly interested in alkahest has been what most of my own personal research has been about. I also have spinal issues amongst other things. haha

    Mulungu 90% is GREAT but it takes 'Doug' around 20-30 grams in decoction(crock pot on low for a few hours) form. Strain, cool and slam down. Make sure to strain well, as this stuff gives gut rot like no other. And 'Doug' can T&W just about any whole plant material. Also found that the 'whole' pieces seem 'better' in some way, maybe its that the powder is so very hard to deal with.[/QUOTE]
    My friend first tried 5 grams in a tea and worked up to 8-10 grams.
    For him it was strange, not so much muscle relaxation and soothing feelings, more of just an overwhelming desire to go to sleep. So this is what he uses it for; he usually places all he powdered bark in a tea filter and boils it covered in a pot for 20-30 mins. Cools it a bit and drinks.
    As for combinations my friend mentions that you should treat it like a mild/moderate benzodiazepine. He mentions having it after an evening of mushrooms as well as edit, he says that he didn't notice any ill effects.
    I hope this helps a bit, let me know how it goes for your friend.
    Peace
    well swim did, he started with a pretty small dose and didnt feel anything .. or nothing noticeable.. its not like he has unlimited amounts of that stuff and doesnt seem to have any allergic or similar reactions to it.


    Read more: Experiences - Experiences With Mulungu (Erythrina mulungu) - Drugs Forum
    swIm has become quite familiar with Mulungu since this thread.

    Mulungu can act as a very strong sedative thus makes it quite a valuable and effective aid for an array of ailments, ranging from certain degrees of anxiety to moderate insomnia.

    swIm have tried both shredded bark and resin, and would prefer the shredded bark since it is much more cost effective - if anything make your own resin with the shredded bark it's cheaper.

    Mulungu has such a pleasant taste as well. When mixed with honey, it makes for a nice cup of tea.

    A friend of mine likes to prepare his Mulungu tea the following way:

    Dosage depends on the individual and what he/she is trying to achieve, whether it be, sleep, slight relaxation, ease anxiety... so basically trial and error is bound until you find your ideal dosage.

    10grams (relaxtion / sleep aid) of shredded bark.. brought to a slight boil and then left to simmer (covered) for 45-60mins.
    My friend has found the longer you simmer the better, since more alkaloids release and result in a stonger tea. I have also read some save the strained bark to re-use, my friend however has yet to try that.

    The effect of Mulungu come on pretty quick. After the first two or three mouthfuls a sense of relaxation is felt. Within 15-25mins the experience has pretty much peaked and a definite sense of tranquility is awaken. Very meditative, and mellow - complete loss of anxiety, calm nerves and mental chatter.

    Mulungu @ the appropriate dosage can be very ideal for those looking for a natural sleep aid.

    Aside from it's unique/pleasurable effect; Mulungu is known to kill bacteria and is said to be rewarding to the liver as well, making Mulungu very beneficial.

    There are certain precautions however that one should be aware, for instance, one should abstain from operating anything that could potentially cause harm to oneself or another; such as driving. The reason being is that Mulungu affects coordination to some extent and the higher the dose the more obvious/apparent it is.

    .peace.


    Read more: Experiences - Experiences With Mulungu (Erythrina mulungu) - Drugs Forum
    Sorry, but I have to disagree with you there BrooklynBoy87. My swim never had much luck with mulungu, but it depends what you're after. If you want insomnia of lower duration, then this might be ok for you.
    But if you want a valium type sleeping bark, this ain't it. It won't send you off to sleep or mellowland if the time's not right, in my opinion. It will only take away the excess tension and psychic anxiety that is unhealthy, but it will not take you back down below baseline to a state that is dopier or more sedated than before.

    I'm just trying to tell you all the truth. I went through a "phase" where every new ethnobotanical that I heard of intrigued me, especially if it was mysterious with tantalising little rumours about it.

    I think the only value of mulungu is to keep on hand behind the kava. 100 times out of 100, you will always prefer to use the kava rather than the mulungu, it is the human way, because most people want to get high, they don't really want something that is so legitimate and proper that they can barely even notice it working.

    So, keep the mulungu on hand for when all the good stuff runs out, that's what I say.
    It's so boring and unappealing that you will never use it up faster than the other stuff.
    Think of it as a backup, a second line of defense.

    I will agree with Brooklyn boy that the taste is quite nice, though.


    Read more: Experiences - Experiences With Mulungu (Erythrina mulungu) - Drugs Forum
    my little green monster has used the shredded bark in tea numerous times to help after a big night. It doesnt put you to sleep but slows down all your thoughts etc so making sleep very easy.

    a friend once was having a really unpleasant trip in BZP/TFMPP and need to abort - after drinking mulungu tea the friend was much more at ease... Possibly placebo and power of suggestion, either way it worked at the time.


    Read more: Experiences - Experiences With Mulungu (Erythrina mulungu) - Drugs Forum
    Yes, it's totally different. I think it works as an anxiolytic antidepressent myself. None of that "hain't tha foggiest" that you get with benzos. This is just a much more clear headed, very very mild thing that won't knock you flat.
    To me, if it does anything at all, I would liken it to tryptophan maybe, just an uplift mellow, not a downer at all.

    Certainly less harmful than benzos.


    Read more: Experiences - Experiences With Mulungu (Erythrina mulungu) - Drugs Forum
    TRIP Report #1

    ROI: 0.5g 90% Alkaloid resin, rolled in a joint with tobacco and smoked

    Effect: Effect was pretty instantanious, mild sedation, relaxation, no noticeable euphoria, anxiolytic properties, slight reduction in motor coordination,no real anti-depressant effect, seemed to last around 1 hour.

    Conclusion: No real recreational value but definite anxiolytic effect.

    TRIP Report #2

    ROI: 1g of 90% Alkaloid resin added to hot water with a little honey and imbibed

    Effect: Effects where noticeable at T+20. Quite powerful sedation and relaxation, mild euphoria, strong anxiolytic properties, reduction in motor coordination, greater clarity of mind opposed to smoking, no real anti-depressant effect or mild at best. Effects are ongoing.

    Conclusion: SWIM still wouldnt say that it had massive recreational value, as others have said SWIM would liken it to 10mg of Valium and certainly recommends that fellow anxiety sufferers give it a try. It wont be pulling SWIM away from Kratom, but it will be held as an addition and used as needed rather than recreationally.

    Read more: Experiences - Experiences With Mulungu (Erythrina mulungu) - Drugs Forum
    My friend decided to give this a try. She's 5'3", 110lbs-ish, 30 years old. Suffers depression, bipolar, anxiety, social anxiety. Particularly bad anxiety going into this trip.

    Recipe: Two tablespoons of Mulungu into 1.25 cups of boiling water. Covered and boiled about two minutes. Didn't smell so tasty so she tossed in a bit of sugar. (She's a tnw-er, not a tea drinker.) Took off heat, still covered, and steeped about three minutes. Found a kitchen instrument that she finally realized was made just for this sort of thing (awesome), strained big pieces out to make about 3/4 a cup of tea (a little left in saucepan). Let tea cool about two minutes and then she put a piece of ice in her cup to speed things up. (She's an impatient lass.)

    She says:
    5:18- First sip, actually tastes very cinnamon-y. Not as bad as expected (though not very good either). Kinda like dirty, cinnamon-y steeped twigs.
    5:20- Just downed it. (She's making funny faces now.)

    5:38- Been twenty minutes... possibly some reduction in anxiety.

    5:53- Downed the rest of the tea about seven minutes ago. Definitely thinking there's some reduction in anxiety beyond placebo effect. Not really something recreational at this level (although perhaps higher?), but definitely something to work with some more in terms of anxiety. She'd agree that it feels like the equivalent of around 5-10mg of valium.

    5:57- She just read over this report. That "bad anxiety" she mentioned isn't really there anymore.

    Anyone know of any negative (or positive) effects from using daily or several times a week?


    Read more: Experiences - Experiences With Mulungu (Erythrina mulungu) - Drugs Forum
    One
    Exceeding, going further, crossing boundery's, taking risks greater then most, next level.

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    Senior Member MeDieViL's Avatar
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    Srry for the huge clutter but forgot my mouse on vacation and currently not on amphetamine either, basicly point of this post, ive been investigating herb with anxiolytic and sedating action, and concluded that many like valerian are shit, and that those 2 next to KAVA KAVA are definatly worth a try, once i'm on amp i'l reorganize this thread, but meanwhile let the discussion begin.
    One
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    Senior Member Tussmann's Avatar
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    I'll definitely stay tuned for this one. Valerian, Kava Kava, Picamilon, Theanine, Passion Flower, Hopps, ect.. ect.. ect.. all crap crap crap. Mega-dosed Taurine is decent, I'll give it that.

    Phenibut is the only OTC compound that has ANY bang for your buck anxiolytic effects IMO, but the tolerance and cycling can be quite a chore.

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    Senior Member Taal's Avatar
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    Looks like I have more stuff to pick up from the vitamin shoppe...
    America, Fuck Yeah.

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    Senior Member John Barleycorn's Avatar
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    A shedload of polyphenols (specifically, flavonoids) have been shown to have an anxiolytic action in vitro, but the usual problem presents of liver metabolism and practical bioavailability. These flavonoids are found in all the usual folk sleeping remedies, such as those mentioned in the thread title plus chamomile, skullcap, etc.

    Some chemical transformations of these natural flavonoids look especially potent. For example, check out how bromo-chrysin stacks up against diazepam. Once again, however, I dunno whether bioavailability remains a roadblock. I guess there is no rule saying this stuff necessarily has to be consumed orally, but there could also be BBB issues.

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    Senior Member MeDieViL's Avatar
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    I made a post about those compounds as the (spare) anecdotes are positive, while the anecdotes of valarian are worse then catpiss.
    One
    Exceeding, going further, crossing boundery's, taking risks greater then most, next level.

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