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  1. #1
    Senior Member niaouli's Avatar
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    Default too much dopamine can cause dopamine dysregulation

    Yet in the long run, too much dopamine can cause dopamine dysregulation and distressing mood swings—both highs and lows. Excess dopamine can lead to chronic low dopamine. The brain's reward circuitry is finely tuned and quite plastic. Addiction research reveals that if we flood it with dopamine (as cocaine users do), it begins to recalibrate itself to cope with excess.

    Just as you might close windows when a thunderstorm rolls in, your reward circuitry down-regulates the receptors for dopamine on key nerve cells after over-stimulation. Especially with repeated episodes, the reward circuitry assumes that another "storm" is on the way, so it may not return to its usual configuration right away. It becomes desensitized. (Parkinson's drugs also tend to lose their effectiveness over time.)


    The result of down-regulation? Normal levels of dopamine won't trigger those subtle feelings of optimism and anticipation that make arising in the morning an attractive proposition. Such sluggishness is a hangover, but it's also withdrawal. It's normal to feel rotten while our brain recalibrates so it can, once again, respond normally to dopamine.

    Meanwhile, we can become so desperate to "feel right," that we may reach for any of the many stimulating activities and substances that goose dopamine: drugs, alcohol, impulsive spending, junk food, Internet porn, gambling, engaging in "forbidden" sex, and so forth. Alas, more stimulation can cause further down-regulation—and an even stronger urge for relief. In short, dopamine lows, just like dopamine highs, can drive compulsive behaviors.

    This may be why "Depression is strongly linked to high-risk behavior, including drug use, alcoholism, and risky sex." Some assume that depression leads to acting out, but it's possible that over-stimulation leads to depression (chronic low dopamine), followed by risky attempts to self-medicate by seeking dopamine surges.

    Apart from that risk, fostering addiction in orgasm lovers could provide a secondary bonanza for drug companies. They are already testing "anti-addiction" pharmaceuticals that manipulate the reward circuitry of the brain by...you guessed it...blocking the effects of dopamine. Trials have caused some patients severe depression and even resulted in suicide. And what do you take if you're not orgasming as easily as you like, but also have an addiction??


    This an extract of Dr Wilson about dysregulation of DA.
    My first question how to optimize DA, especialy to up regulate D2 recptors ?
    My second question, do low dose of APM down regulate DA 2 receptors and with time make you more vulnerable to dopamine dysregulation ?
    Mr. Bean is a patient of Mercola right?

    YES, bravo Ubiyca

  2. #2
    Senior Member Ex Dubio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by niaouli View Post
    Yet in the long run, too much dopamine can cause dopamine dysregulation and distressing mood swings—both highs and lows. Excess dopamine can lead to chronic low dopamine. The brain's reward circuitry is finely tuned and quite plastic. Addiction research reveals that if we flood it with dopamine (as cocaine users do), it begins to recalibrate itself to cope with excess.


    This is such a weird way of saying things. If there is "excess" dopamine, but the system is at homeostasis, then this won't lead to dysregulation. In fact, the system will "stay put".

    What the author is describing is essentially what occurs during constant recreational use of psychostimulants and opiates. This is very little in common with anything therapeutic.

    Just as you might close windows when a thunderstorm rolls in, your reward circuitry down-regulates the receptors for dopamine on key nerve cells after over-stimulation. Especially with repeated episodes, the reward circuitry assumes that another "storm" is on the way, so it may not return to its usual configuration right away. It becomes desensitized. (Parkinson's drugs also tend to lose their effectiveness over time.)
    The Parkinson's thing is a red herring, but OK. Another argument for why chronic use of drugs of abuse is bad. Yep, we get it.

    The result of down-regulation? Normal levels of dopamine won't trigger those subtle feelings of optimism and anticipation that make arising in the morning an attractive proposition. Such sluggishness is a hangover, but it's also withdrawal. It's normal to feel rotten while our brain recalibrates so it can, once again, respond normally to dopamine.


    Again, no relevance except to chronic use of psychostimulants and opiates, particularly at high doses. Note that this is all fixable by cessation of drug use, and in fact he's mostly describing what happens during the [temporary] withdrawal period.

    Meanwhile, we can become so desperate to "feel right," that we may reach for any of the many stimulating activities and substances that goose dopamine: drugs, alcohol, impulsive spending, junk food, Internet porn, gambling, engaging in "forbidden" sex, and so forth. Alas, more stimulation can cause further down-regulation—and an even stronger urge for relief. In short, dopamine lows, just like dopamine highs, can drive compulsive behaviors.
    Uh, yeah, This is why one addiction tends to lead to many. Again, only relevant to addiction.

    This may be why "Depression is strongly linked to high-risk behavior, including drug use, alcoholism, and risky sex." Some assume that depression leads to acting out, but it's possible that over-stimulation leads to depression (chronic low dopamine), followed by risky attempts to self-medicate by seeking dopamine surges.
    This correlation is extremely complex, and the presentation here is misleading. This is a correlation, not causation.

    Apart from that risk, fostering addiction in orgasm lovers could provide a secondary bonanza for drug companies. They are already testing "anti-addiction" pharmaceuticals that manipulate the reward circuitry of the brain by...you guessed it...blocking the effects of dopamine. Trials have caused some patients severe depression and even resulted in suicide. And what do you take if you're not orgasming as easily as you like, but also have an addiction??

    This an extract of Dr Wilson about dysregulation of DA.
    My first question how to optimize DA, especialy to up regulate D2 recptors ?
    My second question, do low dose of APM down regulate DA 2 receptors and with time make you more vulnerable to dopamine dysregulation ?
    Again, this all only has relevance to individuals who are taking short-acting psychostimulants (e.g. cocaine) or opiates and/or those who are withdrawing from them. Otherwise, this is irrelevant.

    If you want to upregulate D2, take an NMDA antagonist like memantine.

    Yes, low-dose amphetamine downregulates DA receptors, but it does so proportionally to the dose. This is a small difference, has no practical ramifications (either than loss of hedonic effects of amphetamine) and reverses with cessation of drug use. No, it doesn't make you "more vulnerable" to DA dysregulation.

  3. #3
    Senior Member niaouli's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ex Dubio View Post
    [/I]This is such a weird way of saying things. If there is "excess" dopamine, but the system is at homeostasis, then this won't lead to dysregulation. In fact, the system will "stay put".

    What the author is describing is essentially what occurs during constant recreational use of psychostimulants and opiates. This is very little in common with anything therapeutic.



    The Parkinson's thing is a red herring, but OK. Another argument for why chronic use of drugs of abuse is bad. Yep, we get it.



    Again, no relevance except to chronic use of psychostimulants and opiates, particularly at high doses. Note that this is all fixable by cessation of drug use, and in fact he's mostly describing what happens during the [temporary] withdrawal period.



    Uh, yeah, This is why one addiction tends to lead to many. Again, only relevant to addiction.



    This correlation is extremely complex, and the presentation here is misleading. This is a correlation, not causation.[I]



    Again, this all only has relevance to individuals who are taking short-acting psychostimulants (e.g. cocaine) or opiates and/or those who are withdrawing from them. Otherwise, this is irrelevant.

    If you want to upregulate D2, take an NMDA antagonist like memantine.

    Yes, low-dose amphetamine downregulates DA receptors, but it does so proportionally to the dose. This is a small difference, has no practical ramifications (either than loss of hedonic effects of amphetamine) and reverses with cessation of drug use. No, it doesn't make you "more vulnerable" to DA dysregulation.

    Thank for this information. After many year's of low dose of amphetamine, did you take some memantine to up regulate your DA2 receptors or not ?
    Mr. Bean is a patient of Mercola right?

    YES, bravo Ubiyca

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    Senior Member Tussmann's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by niaouli View Post
    Thank for this information. After many year's of low dose of amphetamine, did you take some memantine to up regulate your DA2 receptors or not ?

    See the SJW thread on this forum right now. He goes pretty far into this very question.

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    Senior Member Ex Dubio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by niaouli View Post
    Thank for this information. After many year's of low dose of amphetamine, did you take some memantine to up regulate your DA2 receptors or not ?
    What Tussman said.

    But the short answer is no, I don't, and haven't needed to. But I'm using amphetamine fairly strictly for ADHD.

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    Senior Member niaouli's Avatar
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    In Europa, there are difficulty to treat people ADD. In fact, if you go to the web site of Dr Amen, it's easy to known if you have ADD or ADHD.
    ADD Test – Amen Clinics

    For me, it's very clear that I have ADD. The physicians in Europa doesn't known so much about ADD
    Last year's, I'm visiting Dr Mariano for my ADD. I put me on low dose of AMP. AMP help me, but I have some down during the day, like symptoms of depression.

    I try 2.5 mg of lexapro alone, and I don't feel well on it after five days. May be the mix of lexapro and AMP is the key. I don't known.
    Mr. Bean is a patient of Mercola right?

    YES, bravo Ubiyca

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