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  1. #1
    BOOM Chicka Wah Wah
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    Default Benefits of fasting

    The effect on health of alternate day calorie restriction: Eating less and more than needed on alternate days prolongs life

    James B. Johnsona, Corresponding Author Contact Information, E-mail The Corresponding Author, Donald R. Laubb and Sujit Johnc

    aDepartment of Surgery, Louisiana State University Medical Center, 2547A Lyon Street, 2nd Floor, San Francisco, CA 94123, United States

    bDepartment of Surgery, Stanford Medical School, Stanford, CA, United States

    cDepartment of Mathematics, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA, United States
    Received 9 January 2006;
    accepted 16 January 2006.
    Available online 10 March 2006.

    Summary

    Restricting caloric intake to 60–70% of normal adult weight maintenance requirement prolongs lifespan 30–50% and confers near perfect health across a broad range of species. Every other day feeding produces similar effects in rodents, and profound beneficial physiologic changes have been demonstrated in the absence of weight loss in ob/ob mice. Since May 2003 we have experimented with alternate day calorie restriction, one day consuming 20–50% of estimated daily caloric requirement and the next day ad lib eating, and have observed health benefits starting in as little as two weeks, in insulin resistance, asthma, seasonal allergies, infectious diseases of viral, bacterial and fungal origin (viral URI, recurrent bacterial tonsillitis, chronic sinusitis, periodontal disease), autoimmune disorder (rheumatoid arthritis), osteoarthritis, symptoms due to CNS inflammatory lesions (Tourette’s, Meniere’s) cardiac arrhythmias (PVCs, atrial fibrillation), menopause related hot flashes. We hypothesize that other many conditions would be delayed, prevented or improved, including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, multiple sclerosis, brain injury due to thrombotic stroke atherosclerosis, NIDDM, congestive heart failure.

    Our hypothesis is supported by an article from 1957 in the Spanish medical literature which due to a translation error has been construed by several authors to be the only existing example of calorie restriction with good nutrition. We contend for reasons cited that there was no reduction in calories overall, but that the subjects were eating, on alternate days, either 900 calories or 2300 calories, averaging 1600, and that body weight was maintained. Thus they consumed either 56% or 144% of daily caloric requirement. The subjects were in a residence for old people, and all were in perfect health and over 65. Over three years, there were 6 deaths among 60 study subjects and 13 deaths among 60 ad lib-fed controls, non-significant difference. Study subjects were in hospital 123 days, controls 219, highly significant difference. We believe widespread use of this pattern of eating could impact influenza epidemics and other communicable diseases by improving resistance to infection. In addition to the health effects, this pattern of eating has proven to be a good method of weight control, and we are continuing to study the process in conjunction with the NIH.
    Alternate day fasting impacts the brain insulin-signaling pathway of young adult male C57BL/6 mice.
    Lu J, E L, Wang W, Frontera J, Zhu H, Wang WT, Lee P, Choi IY, Brooks WM, Burns JM, Aires D, Swerdlow RH.
    Source

    Department of Neurology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas, USA.
    Abstract

    Dietary restriction (DR) has recognized health benefits that may extend to brain. We examined how DR affects bioenergetics-relevant enzymes and signaling pathways in the brains of C57BL/6 mice. Five-month-old male mice were placed in ad libitum or one of two repeated fasting and refeeding (RFR) groups, an alternate day (intermittent fed; IF) or alternate day plus antioxidants (blueberry, pomegranate, and green tea extracts) (IF + AO) fed group. During the 24-h fast blood glucose levels initially fell but stabilized within 6 h of starting the fast, thus avoiding frank hypoglycemia. DR in general appeared to enhance insulin sensitivity. After six weeks brain AKT and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta phosphorylation were lower in the RFR mice, suggesting RFR reduced brain insulin-signaling pathway activity. Pathways that mediate mitochondrial biogenesis were not activated; AMP kinase phosphorylation, silent information regulator 2 phosphorylation, peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1 alpha levels, and cytochrome oxidase subunit 4 levels did not change. ATP levels also did not decline, which suggests the RFR protocols did not directly impact brain bioenergetics. Antioxidant supplementation did not affect the brain parameters we evaluated. Our data indicate in young adult male C57BL/6 mice, RFR primarily affects brain energy metabolism by reducing brain insulin signaling, which potentially results indirectly as a consequence of reduced peripheral insulin production.
    Insulin and aging.
    Bartke A.
    Source

    Department of Internal Medicine and Department of Physiology, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Springfield, Illinois 62794-9628, USA. abartke@siumed.edu
    Abstract

    In invertebrates, signaling pathways homologous to mammalian insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) signal transduction have a major role in the control of longevity. There are numerous indications that these pathways also influence aging in mammals, but separating the role of insulin from the effects of IGF-1 and growth hormone (GH) is difficult. In mice, selective disruption of the insulin receptor in the adipose tissue extends longevity. Increases in lifespan were also reported in mice with deletion of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) in whole body or IRS2 only in the brain. GH deficiency or resistance in mutant mice leads to hypoinsulinemia and enhanced insulin sensitivity along with remarkably extended longevity. These characteristics resemble animals subjected to calorie restriction. Studies of physiological characteristics and polymorphisms of insulin-related genes in exceptionally long-lived people suggest a role of insulin signaling in the control of human aging.
    The effects of intermittent or continuous energy restriction on weight loss and metabolic disease risk markers: a randomized trial in young overweight women.
    Harvie MN, Pegington M, Mattson MP, Frystyk J, Dillon B, Evans G, Cuzick J, Jebb SA, Martin B, Cutler RG, Son TG, Maudsley S, Carlson OD, Egan JM, Flyvbjerg A, Howell A.
    Source

    Genesis Prevention Centre, University Hospital of South Manchester NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK.
    Abstract

    Background:The problems of adherence to energy restriction in humans are well known.Objective:To compare the feasibility and effectiveness of intermittent continuous energy (IER) with continuous energy restriction (CER) for weight loss, insulin sensitivity and other metabolic disease risk markers.Design:Randomized comparison of a 25% energy restriction as IER (∼2710 kJ/day for 2 days/week) or CER (∼6276 kJ/day for 7 days/week) in 107 overweight or obese (mean (±s.d.) body mass index 30.6 (±5.1) kg m(-2)) premenopausal women observed over a period of 6 months. Weight, anthropometry, biomarkers for breast cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and dementia risk; insulin resistance (HOMA), oxidative stress markers, leptin, adiponectin, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 and IGF binding proteins 1 and 2, androgens, prolactin, inflammatory markers (high sensitivity C-reactive protein and sialic acid), lipids, blood pressure and brain-derived neurotrophic factor were assessed at baseline and after 1, 3 and 6 months.Results:Last observation carried forward analysis showed that IER and CER are equally effective for weight loss: mean (95% confidence interval ) weight change for IER was -6.4 (-7.9 to -4.8) kg vs -5.6 (-6.9 to -4.4) kg for CER (P-value for difference between groups=0.4). Both groups experienced comparable reductions in leptin, free androgen index, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, total and LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure and increases in sex hormone binding globulin, IGF binding proteins 1 and 2. Reductions in fasting insulin and insulin resistance were modest in both groups, but greater with IER than with CER; difference between groups for fasting insulin was -1.2 (-1.4 to -1.0) μU ml(-1) and for insulin resistance was -1.2 (-1.5 to -1.0) μU mmol(-1) l(-1) (both P=0.04).Conclusion:IER is as effective as CER with regard to weight loss, insulin sensitivity and other health biomarkers, and may be offered as an alternative equivalent to CER for weight loss and reducing disease risk.International Journal of Obesity advance online publication, 5 October 2010; doi:10.1038/ijo.2010.171.
    Improvements in LDL particle size and distribution by short-term alternate day modified fasting in obese adults.
    Varady KA, Bhutani S, Klempel MC, Lamarche B.
    Source

    Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1919 West Taylor Street, Room 506F, Chicago, IL 60612, USA. varady@uic.edu
    Abstract

    Alternate day modified fasting (ADMF) beneficially modulates several indicators of CHD risk, but its effects on LDL particle size have never been tested. Accordingly, we examined the effects of ADMF on LDL particle size and distribution in obese adults. Sixteen obese subjects participated in a 10-week trial with three consecutive phases: (1) 2-week control phase; (2) 4-week ADMF controlled feeding phase; (3) 4-week ADMF self-selected feeding phase. After 8 weeks of diet, body weight and waist circumference were reduced (P < 0·05) by 5·6 (sem 0·9) kg and 4·0 (sem 0·9) cm, respectively. LDL-cholesterol and TAG concentrations decreased (P < 0·05) by 25 (sem 10) % and 32 (sem 6) %, respectively. Peak LDL particle size increased (P < 0·05) from 266 (sem 1) to 268 (sem 1) Å. Additionally, the proportion of small LDL particles decreased (P < 0·05) from 13 (sem 2) % to 9 (sem 3) %, while the proportion of large LDL particles increased (P < 0·05) from 68 (sem 4) % to 76 (sem 4) % post-treatment. These findings suggest that ADMF is an effective diet strategy for increasing LDL particle size and decreasing the proportion of small, dense LDL particles in obese adults
    Modified alternate-day fasting regimens reduce cell proliferation rates to a similar extent as daily calorie restriction in mice.
    Varady KA, Roohk DJ, McEvoy-Hein BK, Gaylinn BD, Thorner MO, Hellerstein MK.
    Source

    Department of Nutritional Sciences and Toxicology, University of California at Berkeley, Morgan Hall, Rm. 308, Berkeley, California, 94720-3104, USA. kvarady@nature.berkeley.edu
    Abstract

    Calorie restriction (CR) and alternate-day fasting (ADF) reduce cancer risk and reduce cell proliferation rates. Whether modified ADF regimens (i.e., allowing a portion of energy needs to be consumed on the fast day) work, as well as true ADF or CR to reduce global cell proliferation rates, remains unresolved. Here, we measured the effects of true ADF, modified ADF, and daily CR on cell proliferation rates in mice. Thirty female C57BL/6J mice were randomized to one of five interventions for 4 wk: 1) CR-25% (25% reduction in daily energy intake), 2) ADF-75% (75% reduction on fast day), 3) ADF-85% (85% reduction on fast day), 4) ADF-100% (100% reduction on fast day), and 5) control (ad libitum intake). Body weights of the ADF groups did not differ from controls, whereas the CR-25% group weighed less than all other groups posttreatment. Epidermal cell proliferation decreased (P<0.01) by 29, 20, and 31% in the CR-25%, ADF-85% and ADF-100% groups, respectively, relative to controls. Proliferation rates of splenic T cells were reduced (P<0.01) by 37, 32, and 31% in the CR-25%, ADF-85%, and ADF-100% groups, respectively, and mammary epithelial cell proliferation was 70, 65, and 62% lower (P<0.01), compared with controls. Insulin-like growth factor-1 levels were reduced (P<0.05) in the CR-25% and ADF-100% groups only. In summary, modified ADF, allowing the consumption of 15% of energy needs on the restricted intake day, decreases global cell proliferation similarly as true ADF and daily CR without reducing body weight.
    Alternate-day fasting and chronic disease prevention: a review of human and animal trials1,2,3
    Krista A Varady and Marc K Hellerstein
    1 From the Department of Nutritional Sciences and Toxicology, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA

    2 Supported by the Natural Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

    3 Reprints not available. Address correspondence to KA Varady, Department of Nutritional Sciences and Toxicology, University of California, Berkeley, Morgan Hall, Room 308, Berkeley, CA 94720-3104. E-mail: kvarady@nature.berkeley.edu.

    ABSTRACT

    Calorie restriction (CR) and alternate-day fasting (ADF) represent 2 different forms of dietary restriction. Although the effects of CR on chronic disease prevention were reviewed previously, the effects of ADF on chronic disease risk have yet to be summarized. Accordingly, we review here animal and human evidence concerning ADF and the risk of certain chronic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. We also compare the magnitude of risk reduction resulting from ADF with that resulting from CR. In terms of diabetes risk, animal studies of ADF find lower diabetes incidence and lower fasting glucose and insulin concentrations, effects that are comparable to those of CR. Human trials to date have reported greater insulin-mediated glucose uptake but no effect on fasting glucose or insulin concentrations. In terms of cardiovascular disease risk, animal ADF data show lower total cholesterol and triacylglycerol concentrations, a lower heart rate, improved cardiac response to myocardial infarction, and lower blood pressure. The limited human evidence suggests higher HDL-cholesterol concentrations and lower triacylglycerol concentrations but no effect on blood pressure. In terms of cancer risk, there is no human evidence to date, yet animal studies found decreases in lymphoma incidence, longer survival after tumor inoculation, and lower rates of proliferation of several cell types. The findings in animals suggest that ADF may effectively modulate several risk factors, thereby preventing chronic disease, and that ADF may modulate disease risk to an extent similar to that of CR. More research is required to establish definitively the consequences of ADF.

    FULL TEXT HERE Alternate-day fasting and chronic disease prevention: a review of human and animal trials

    A LINK TO ANOTHER FULL STUDY ON ADF http://jn.nutrition.org/content/31/3/363.full.pdf

  2. #2
    BOOM Chicka Wah Wah
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    Talking Some more

    Here we see an overview of the benefits of fasting which I believe a majority of those benefits of calorie restriction would still apply while even only fasting for part of the day (16-18hr) if you are doing it daily.

    Actually by doing intermittent fasting I think the benefits will even be greater over calorie restriction. See link below:
    By employing ADF in rats they were able to prolong the lifespan without stunting the growth of the rats which were a result of calorie restriction.

    Also here is a study that shows IF to be superior to calorie restriction in improving metabolic syndrome markers



    lowered triglycerides and LDL-C numbers




    The popular c. elegans worm enjoys increased longevity with both twenty-four and forty-eight hour IFs via signaling through a gene that we all have.
    Signalling through RHEB-1 mediates intermittent fa... [Nature. 2009] - PubMed result
    We all have that gene




    Reductions in brain insulin signaling




    "human cancer patients found that fasting during chemotherapy reduced the negative side effects of the treatment"




    marked improvements in inflammatory markers, systemic oxidative load, blood lipids, and a decrease in severity and frequency of asthma symptoms from ADF




    experienced improvements "in insulin resistance, asthma, seasonal allergies, infectious diseases of viral, bacterial and fungal origin (viral URI, recurrent bacterial tonsillitis, chronic sinusitis, periodontal disease), autoimmune disorder (rheumatoid arthritis), osteoarthritis, symptoms due to CNS inflammatory lesions (Tourette’s, Meniere’s) cardiac arrhythmias (PVCs, atrial fibrillation), menopause related hot flashes."




    overall fat oxidation was shown to increase by an average of 15 g/d over the course of the trial, according to indirect calorimetry. The authors also observed a positive correlation between fat oxidation and weight loss, which suggested that those subjects with a greater ability to oxidize fat may have lost more weigh

    Alternate-day fasting in nonobese subjects: effects on body weight, body composition, and energy metabolism
    Effects of fat loss




    Weight loss (but in mice for the most part)




    Weight loss in humans




    Fasting induces GH secretion




    improved muscle protein synthesis from training in a fasted state




    Higher anabolic response to post workout feedings following a fasted workout




    No effect on performance from training in a fasted state








    The idea of IF has also been endorsed by many prominent researchers in the paleo circle. Cordain and Wolf have done research in this field. He is a great resource to some of their stuff -

    Paleo Digest

    It is sort of a compilation of the science behind IF including the potential of increased lifespan, improved nutrient partitioning and an enhanced neuro-endocrine response to exercise.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Benson's Avatar
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    Routine Periodic Fasting Is Good for Your Health, and Your Heart, Study Suggests

    ScienceDaily (May 20, 2011) — Fasting has long been associated with religious rituals, diets, and political protests. Now new evidence from cardiac researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute demonstrates that routine periodic fasting is also good for your health, and your heart.

    Research cardiologists at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute are reporting that fasting not only lowers one's risk of coronary artery disease and diabetes, but also causes significant changes in a person's blood cholesterol levels. Both diabetes and elevated cholesterol are known risk factors for coronary heart disease.

    The discovery expands upon a 2007 Intermountain Healthcare study that revealed an association between fasting and reduced risk of coronary heart disease, the leading cause of death among men and women in America. In the new research, fasting was also found to reduce other cardiac risk factors, such as triglycerides, weight, and blood sugar levels.

    The findings were presented on April 3, at the annual scientific sessions of the American College of Cardiology in New Orleans.
    "These new findings demonstrate that our original discovery was not a chance event," says Dr. Benjamin D. Horne, PhD, MPH, director of cardiovascular and genetic epidemiology at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute, and the study's principal investigator. "The confirmation among a new set of patients that fasting is associated with lower risk of these common diseases raises new questions about how fasting itself reduces risk or if it simply indicates a healthy lifestyle."

    Unlike the earlier research by the team, this new research recorded reactions in the body's biological mechanisms during the fasting period. The participants' low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, the "bad" cholesterol) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, the "good" cholesterol) both increased (by 14 percent and 6 percent, respectively) raising their total cholesterol -- and catching the researchers by surprise.

    "Fasting causes hunger or stress. In response, the body releases more cholesterol, allowing it to utilize fat as a source of fuel, instead of glucose. This decreases the number of fat cells in the body," says Dr. Horne. "This is important because the fewer fat cells a body has, the less likely it will experience insulin resistance, or diabetes."

    This recent study also confirmed earlier findings about the effects of fasting on human growth hormone (HGH), a metabolic protein. HGH works to protect lean muscle and metabolic balance, a response triggered and accelerated by fasting. During the 24-hour fasting periods, HGH increased an average of 1,300 percent in women, and nearly 2,000 percent in men.

    In this most recent trial, researchers conducted two fasting studies of over 200 individuals -- both patients and healthy volunteers -- who were recruited at Intermountain Medical Center. A second 2011 clinical trial followed another 30 patients who drank only water and ate nothing else for 24 hours. They were also monitored while eating a normal diet during an additional 24-hour period. Blood tests and physical measurements were taken from all to evaluate cardiac risk factors, markers of metabolic risk, and other general health parameters.

    While the results were surprising to researchers, it's not time to start a fasting diet just yet. It will take more studies like these to fully determine the body's reaction to fasting and its effect on human health. Dr. Horne believes that fasting could one day be prescribed as a treatment for preventing diabetes and coronary heart disease.

    To help achieve the goal of expanded research, the Deseret Foundation (which funded the previous fasting studies) recently approved a new grant to evaluate many more metabolic factors in the blood using stored samples from the recent fasting clinical trial. The researchers will also include an additional clinical trial of fasting among patients who have been diagnosed with coronary heart disease.
    "We are very grateful for the financial support from the Deseret Foundation. The organization and its donors have made these groundbreaking studies of fasting possible," added Dr. Horne.
    Remember, believe none of what you hear and half of what you see...





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    I did this with good results. Fat for fuel always works, only walk though, running eats the muscle, well with me anyway.

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    Lots of good info in here. I've enjoyed IF for the last 4 months and it has been very effective for both fat loss and muscle retention
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    What are the rough guidelines for staggering calories throughout the week? I first came upon this idea reading Martin Berkham's website in which he suggested eating well above maintenance of workout days and then less on non-workout days with fewer carbohydrates. Whether eating maintenance or sub-maintenance calories on non-workout days is better I don't know.

    2500 maintenance

    Lift 3500kcals
    Rest 2500
    Lift 3500
    Rest 2500
    Lift 3500
    Rest 2500
    Rest 2500

    Something like that?

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    visit my nutrition & exercise science blog!
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    I still find that the majority of beneficial results were seen in animals/humans that lost weight (i.e werent on a isocaloric diet) and therefore find it hard to tease out what benefits came from fasting and what came from a modified-CR regimen.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ProphetofProfit View Post
    What are the rough guidelines for staggering calories throughout the week? I first came upon this idea reading Martin Berkham's website in which he suggested eating well above maintenance of workout days and then less on non-workout days with fewer carbohydrates. Whether eating maintenance or sub-maintenance calories on non-workout days is better I don't know.

    2500 maintenance

    Lift 3500kcals
    Rest 2500
    Lift 3500
    Rest 2500
    Lift 3500
    Rest 2500
    Rest 2500

    Something like that?

    I've been following Martins protocol for the most part and what he recommends for the Lean gains recomp is +20% over maintenance on workout days and -20% under maintenance on nonworkout/cardio/ rest days. I have been following that to a T, and have managed to maintain the same weight while dropping around 2% bodyfat in the last couple months
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    Any good articles on IF? I know there's several threads but I'm not looking to read an endless list of abstracts, just an overview of what, why and how.
    <span style='font-family:Optima'><span style='color:blue'>Creation is a machine</span></span>

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    Quote Originally Posted by Supnut View Post
    Any good articles on IF? I know there's several threads but I'm not looking to read an endless list of abstracts, just an overview of what, why and how.
    There is a lot of great info to look through at www.leangains.com

    Martins site and where my diet is based from.
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    The September 2012 edition of Men's Journal Magazine has a great article about IF.

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    according to a research of a Chinese scientist.. it is said that fasting helps to slow down the aging process .. in other words , through fasting a human may be able to live longer as staying hungry makes the cell decay process a lot slower..

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    Quote Originally Posted by theleftbrain View Post
    according to a research of a Chinese scientist.. it is said that fasting helps to slow down the aging process .. in other words , through fasting a human may be able to live longer as staying hungry makes the cell decay process a lot slower..
    Interesting. Do you happen to have the source for this?
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    I watched a documentary on fasting on BBC 2 (England) a few months ago. Their explanation was that our genes repair during fasting or calorie restriction and this is good for slowing down aging.

    I've been fasting for over a year now and I feel better than ever, that's good enough for me.

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    Wow! That is some great info about fasting. I save it under read later because I don't have the time to read all of it but it looks like some good information from the paragraph I read. I'm thinking about giving it a try next week sometimes. I need to lose a couple more pounds in order to reach my goal then start my weight lifting journey. I'm pumped up so much, I can't wait to give it a try lol.

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    Let me get this straight - you are still eating the same number of total calories or less?

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    Sounds like a pain in the ass to be honest. Counting all of those calories every single day would be a chore.

    There is nothing less Paleo than counting calories. Just listen to your body, it will demand a big meal after a hard workout.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lynskey View Post
    I did this with good results. Fat for fuel always works, only walk though, running eats the muscle, well with me anyway.

    How zoon did you see results?

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    I have done some fasting and it worked out pretty well for me. However, it did take me quite a bit of time to lose the weight that I wanted to. However, once I did lose it, the payment I got in my health was well worth it!

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