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    What follows is a newsletter from Dr. Stephen Sinatra, including scientific references at the very bottom.









    When a nutritionally savvy colleague called to tell me about a new form of marine algae, I immediately perked up. “I know you love seaweed,” my friend said, “so I know you’re going to love this stuff. It looks like a real genie in the bottle—a natural for your heart patients, for people with arthritis and diabetes, and it might even protect against Alzheimer’s disease.”



    If you’ve read this newsletter for any length of time, you know that I indeed do love seaweed because it has tremendous medicinal value. I eat it fairly often, but I’m in a minority on that point. By and large, Americans avoid seaweed because the look and texture are more than a lot of folks care to sample. But Asian societies—particularly in Japan and Korea—know the score. Seaweed is part of their dietary tradition, and those groups consistently have the lowest incidence of cancer and cardiovascular disease in the world.



    Multiple Health Benefits



    In spite of its less-than-appetizing image, seaweed has a lot going for it. It contains a rich concentration of nutrients, including iodine—an element necessary for the production of thyroid hormones. It’s also high in sodium alginate, which helps our bodies eliminate radioactive strontium—a breakdown product of uranium that we are constantly exposed to through sunlight, x-rays, and microwaves.



    The information I received from my colleague was about a standardized complex of natural plant compounds, called phenols, extracted from the edible Asian red-brown algae, Ecklonia cava. The plant grows deep in the waters off Japan and South Korea. More than a decade of research, mostly in Korea, has resulted in dozens of studies supporting Ecklonia cava extract’s powerful anti-inflammatory properties and its broad anti-aging, chronic disease, and pain benefits.



    Because inflammation was one of the conditions Ecklonia cava extract (ECE) had been shown to be effective against, I decided to put it to the test during a few days of downtime in Colorado last winter. I was eager to do some mogul skiing—a sport where you ski down a bump-filled slope. It’s a crazy passion of mine, and I usually pay for it in the form of pain in my arthritic hips. In fact, I hadn’t done any mogul skiing the year before because of the pain. But I ventured out and tackled three small mogul runs. To my surprise and delight, I had no discomfort afterward. The results encouraged me to have family members and patients try ECE, too. The feedback has been nothing but positive.



    A Natural COX Inhibitor



    Research shows that the extract is a remarkable anti-inflammatory agent. In animal models, ECE has been shown to suppress the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB) response. NF-kB molecules exist deep inside all cells and are one of the means through which the inflammatory response is initiated. When NF-kB is active, for example, it sends a signal that induces the body to make cyclooxygenase (COX), a pro-inflammatory agent. (COX, as you probably know, is a target of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs taken to reduce pain.) ECE has also been shown, at the same time, to help build up superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione perioxidase—the body’s natural inflammation fighters.



    This selective inflammation-fighting activity, according to the research, has translated into measurable reductions of chronic pain and disability for people with conditions such as arthritis, neuralgia, and fibromyalgia. What’s more, it has implications for cardiovascular health. Remember, inflammation is a primary cause of arterial disease. If you can put a damper on the body’s inflammatory response—no matter where it occurs—you are supporting your cardiovascular system.



    Better Blood Flow



    The extract also appears to have other welcome influences on arterial health. One of those benefits is the inhibition of antiplasmin, a protein that may be high in people whose blood is thicker than it should be.



    A second benefit is its ability to naturally inhibit the angiotensin converting enzyme and dilate blood vessels. This enzyme, also called ACE, tends to rise as we age, and it contributes to blood vessel constriction and hypertension. If you have high blood pressure, your doctor may have prescribed an ACE inhibitor to address the condition. Although these drugs work well, they have an array of side effects, including a dry cough. The emergence of this natural, artery-friendly remedy, which research has been shown to have similar effects, is encouraging.



    Endothelial Protector



    Ecklonia cava extract also scores high marks as an antioxidant. Its unique chemical structure makes it a highly potent “trapping machine” when it comes to disarming free radicals. According to tests, it has far greater oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) potential than land-based phenol compounds. ORAC refers to a method of measuring antioxidant capacities of different foods, and it was developed at the National Institute of Aging.



    Specifically, the tests indicate that ECE effectively combats peroxynitrites, a class of free radicals that are toxic to endothelial and smooth muscle arterial cells. Peroxynitrites have also been associated with the cognitive dysfunction that affects people with Alzheimer’s. Because the chemical structure of the extract allows it to pass through the blood-brain barrier, it may eventually be shown to also provide some protection against Alzheimer’s-related degeneration.



    But Wait, There’s More



    By now, you’re probably thinking this substance is too good to be true. But I would be remiss if I didn’t tell you that ECE may also benefit people with diabetes. Additional research has shown that it can help inactivate aldose reductase, an enzyme that significantly influences the creation of damaging advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) in the blood. These molecules form when blood sugar is high over long periods of time, and they damage arteries and other tissue via oxidative and inflammatory actions. AGEs are involved in almost all diabetes complications. Two informal studies at Korean universities showed that ECE reduced blood glucose levels among groups of pre-diabetic women and patients with early-phase diabetes. If you have lower blood sugar, you’ll be less likely to have damaging levels of AGEs.



    Ecklonia cava extract is usually sold under the brand name Seanol. I’ve added it to my own supplement line at www.drsinatra.com, 800-304-1708, and you’ll also find it in a product called FibroBoost, available at www.fibronol.com. My recommended dosage is 720 mg daily.



    References



    Kang K, et al. Antioxidative properties of brown algae polyphenolics and their perspectives as chemoprotective agents against vascular risk factors. Arch Pharm Res. 2003;26(4):286–293.

    Shibata T, et al. Inhibitory effects of brown algal phlorotannins on secretory phospholipase A2s, lipoxygenases and cyclooxygenases. J Appl Phys. 2003;15(1):61–66.

    Shin HC, et al. An antioxidative and anti-inflammatory agent for potential treatment of osteoarthritis from Ecklonia cava. Arch Pharm Res. 2006;29(2):165–171.






    More references :



    Glombitza, KW, Gerstberger G. Phlorotannins with dibenzodioxin

    structural elements from the brown alga eisenia arborea. Phytochemistry.

    1985;24: 543-551.



    -- Shin HC, Hwang HJ, Kang KJ, Lee BH. An antioxidative and

    antiinflammatory agent for potential treatment of osteoarthritis from

    Ecklonia cava. Arch Pharm Res. 2006 Feb;29(2):165-71.



    -- Kang K, Park Y, Hwang HJ, Kim SH, Lee JG, Shin H-C. Antioxidative

    properties of brown algae polyphenolics and their perspectives as

    chemopreventive agents against vascular risk factors. Arch. Pharm. Res.

    2003;26: 286-293.



    -- Nakamura T, Nagayama K, Uchida K, Tanaka R. Antioxidant activity of

    phlorotannins isolated from the brown alga eisenia bicyclis. Fisheries

    Sci. 1996;62: 923-926.



    -- Kang KA, Lee KH, Chae S, Zhang R, Jung MS, Lee Y, Kim SY, Kim HS, Joo

    HG, Park JW, Ham YM, Lee NH, Hyun JW. Eckol isolated from Ecklonia cava

    attenuates oxidative stress induced cell damage in lung fibroblast

    cells. FEBS Lett. 2005 Nov 21;579(28):6295-304. Epub 2005 Oct 19.



    -- Kang KA, Lee KH, Chae S, Zhang R, Jung MS, Ham YM, Baik JS, Lee NH,

    Hyun JW. Cytoprotective effect of phloroglucinol on oxidative stress

    induced cell damage via catalase activation. J Cell Biochem. 2006 Feb

    15;97(3):609-20.



    -- Kim MM, Ta QV, Mendis E, Rajapakse N, Jung WK, Byun HG, Jeon YJ, Kim

    SK. Phlorotannins in Ecklonia cava extract inhibit matrix

    metalloproteinase activity. Life Sci. 2006 Sep 5;79(15):1436-43. Epub

    2006 May 7.



    -- Joe MJ, Kim SM, Choi HY, ShinWS, Park GM, Kang DW, Kim YK, The

    inhibitory effects of eckol and dieckol from ecklonia stolonifera on the

    expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 in human dermal fibroblasts.

    Biol Pharm Bull. 2006; 29:1735-1739.



    -- Fukuyama Y, Kodama M, Miura I, Kinzyo Z, Mori H, Nakayama Y,

    Takahashi M. Anti-plasmin inhibitor. VI. Structure of

    phlorofucofuroeckol A, a novel phlorotannin with both dibenzo-1,4-dioxin

    and dibenzofuran elements, from Ecklonia kurome Okamura. Chem Pharm Bull

    (Tokyo). 1990 Jan;38(1):133-5.



    -- Fukuyama Y, Kodama M, Miura I, Kinzyo Z, Kido M, Mori H, Nakayama Y,

    Takahashi M. Structure of an anti-plasmin inhibitor, eckol, isolated

    from the brown alga ecklonia kurome okamura and inhibitory activities of

    its derivatives on plasmin inhibitors. Chem. Pharm. Bull. 1989;37:

    349-353.



    -- Shibata T, Fujimoto K, Nagayama K, Yamaguchi K, Nakamura T.

    Inhibitory activity of brown algal phlorotannins against hyaluronidase.

    Int. J. Food Sci. Tech. 2002;37: 703-709.



    -- Shibata T, Nagayama K, Tanaka R, Yamaguchi K, Nakamura T. Inhibitory

    effects of brown algal phlorotannins on secretory phospholipase a2s,

    lipoxygenases and cycloxygenases. J. Appl. Phycol. 2003;15: 61-66.



    -- Myung CS, Shin HC, Bao HY, Yeo SJ, Lee BH, Kang JS. Improvement of

    memory by dieckol and phlorofucofuroeckol in ethanol-treated mice:

    possible involvement of the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase. Arch

    Pharm Res. 2005 Jun;28(6):691-8.



    -- Tsukada H, Nishiyama S, Fukumoto D, Ohba H, Sato K, Kakiuchi T.

    Effects of acute acetylcholinesterase inhibition on the cerebral

    cholinergic neuronal system and cognitive function: Functional imaging

    of the conscious monkey brain using animal PET in combination with

    microdialysis. Synapse. 2004 Apr;52(1):1-10.



    -- Uhm C-S, Kim K-B, Lim JH, Pee D-H, Kim Y-H, Kim H, Eun B-L, Tockgo

    Y-C. Effective treatment with fucoidin for perinatal hypoxic-ischemic

    encephalopathy in rats. Neuroscience Letters. 2003; 353(4):21-24.



    -- Unpublished research findings, Prof. Bongho Lee (Hanbat National

    University, Korea); visiting scholar, National Institute of Aging,

    National Institute of Health, 2004.



    -- J-H Hong, B-S Son, B-K Kim, H-Y Chee, K-S Song, B-H Lee, H-C Shin,

    K-B Lee. Antihypertensive effect of Ecklonia cava extract. Korean

    Journal Pharmacognosy. 2006; 37(3): 200-205. (Kor; Eng; 23 ref).



    -- HYUN AJ, SOOK KH, HYEUNG RK, JAE SC. Angiotensin-converting enzyme I

    inhibitory activity of phlorotannins from Ecklonia stolonifera.

    Fisheries Science. 72 (6), 1292-1299.



    -- Becker AJ, Uckert S, Stief CG, Scheller F, Knapp WH, Hartmann U,

    Jonas U. Plasma levels of angiotensin II during different penile

    conditions in the cavernous and systemic blood of healthy men and

    patients with erectile dysfunction. Urology. 2001 Nov;58(5):805-10.



    -- Unpublished research findings, Prof. Bongho Lee (Hanbat National

    University, Korea); visiting scholar, National Institute of Aging,

    National Institute of Health, 2004.



    -- Effect of KLS (renamed SEANOL-AL) on Allergen-induced murine asthma

    model (Summary), Dr. Emil Chi, Chairman, Dept. of Histopathology,

    University of Washington, 2005



    -- Effect of Mo'bar on hemopoiesis, Endothelial function,

    Endocrinological profile, and Daily activities in Adults, Yangsoo Jang,

    Cardiology Division, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul,

    Korea, November 2001.



    -- HYUN AJ, SOOK KH, HYEUNG RK, JAE SC. Angiotensin-converting enzyme I

    inhibitory activity of phlorotannins from Ecklonia stolonifera Fisheries

    Science. 72 (6), 1292-1299.



    -- Becker AJ, Uckert S, Stief CG, Scheller F, Knapp WH, Hartmann U,

    Jonas U. Plasma levels of angiotensin II during different penile

    conditions in the cavernous and systemic blood of healthy men and

    patients with erectile dysfunction. Urology. 2001 Nov;58(5):805-10.



    -- SEANOL--Obesity/DGAT Research Notes, Hyeon-Cheol Shin, Ph.D, LiveChem

    Inc., Seoul, Korea, 2005.



    -- The Beneficial Effects of Feeding SEANOL-Based Drink "X2" In a Fat

    Mouse Model Study, Emil Chi Ph.D., Department of Pathology, University

    of Washington, November 2004



    -- Evaluation of Toxicity of SEANOL[TM], Hyeon-Cheol Shin, Ph.D,

    LiveChem Inc., Seoul, Korea, June 2007.



    You can also find a summary of the science behind Seanol at http://www.fibronol.com/SEANOL_Science_11-07.pdf.

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    Ecklonia cava extract is usually sold under the brand name Seanol. I’ve added it to my own supplement line...




    Once again, most of that research is in vitro or in animals. As far as I can tell, there exists only one human trial of this stuff.
    Remember, believe none of what you hear and half of what you see...





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    Quote Originally Posted by Benson View Post




    Once again, most of that research is in vitro or in animals. As far as I can tell, there exists only one human trial of this stuff.




    I agree. Despite from my post which may appear as though I'm totally in favor of this new kid on the block, I'm still being cautious. We've only heard of in vitro studies and what's more, what've not heard of the potential side-effects.



    I'll wait until more is known about EC before I try it i.e. human studies.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chip Douglas View Post
    I'll wait until more is known about EC before I try it i.e. human studies.


    Well it probably won't hurt you. Seaweed in one form or another has been part of the diet in some cultures for a long time. What is not supported by the research at this point are the supposed benefits.
    Remember, believe none of what you hear and half of what you see...





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    Quote Originally Posted by Benson View Post
    Well it probably won't hurt you. Seaweed in one form or another has been part of the diet in some cultures for a long time. What is not supported by the research at this point are the supposed benefits.


    I also wonder about the alleged 'scarcity' of this algea. I'm afraid this is going or already is one of the marketing scheme to promote the sales of this stuff. So far as I'm concerned, limited supplies of this stuff means I'm not going to start on it. I mean, what if I were going to love it and then in a few years or months from now, manufacturers run out of it ?



    However, my BS meter sets off any time I hear of limited supplies or protected species mentioned about any dietary supplements.

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    Aren't algae full of arsenic and mercury?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chip Douglas View Post
    However, my BS meter sets off any time I hear of limited supplies or protected species mentioned about any dietary supplements.
    PM me for a great deal on panda penis extract.

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    Quote Originally Posted by aLurker View Post
    PM me for a great deal on panda penis extract.


    PM SENT!!!1!!



    But yeah, I hear what you guys are saying. If it's a supplement that can only be harvest in August during a full moon by one-legged Leprechauns...


    If someone says something about you, and it really bothers you, it's probably because it's true.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kimbo View Post
    PM SENT!!!1!!



    But yeah, I hear what you guys are saying. If it's a supplement that can only be harvest in August during a full moon by one-legged Leprechauns...


    ...you can expect Biotest to market it.

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    I noticed while taking it my erections were so powerful it felt like having a third arm. However, I think this is mostly due to being 21 years old. I've heard panda penis is an insane aphrodisiac though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Odium View Post
    ...you can expect Biotest to market it.



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    Default testing1

    testing1

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    am currently using EC

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    Currently 66 years old

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    Using Swanson 53mg capsules, one a day

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    Recovering from colon cancer surgery and chemotherapy.

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    Using EC for purported ability to clean plaque from arteries,

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    It also is said to improve endothelial function and promote production of nitric oxide.

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    Cannot say, at the current dose, there has been noticeable physical or mental improvement. But clearing plaque and boosting NO are desirable for current recovery.

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    From reading this and other helpful forums, it seems increasing the dosage is a viable option as Swanson is currently having a 2 for the price of 1 sale on EC.

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