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    Hello guys ,
    I hope i am writing in the right section of the forum . I 've been experiencing symptoms like unrefreshing sleep,fatigue,anxiety,brain fog and severe exercise intolerance for the past months ... To begin with , the only thing that the tests has shown was a hashimoto thyroiditis (active while i was making the tests) and some high cortisol values (especially in the evening,also some low dhea) . I tried to take t4 treatment but it ended up increasing my anxiety (panic attacks) so i stopped it . I am unable to perfom any aerobic activity and i can do minimum anaerobic exercise . Now before you jump on me , i was playing 2 sports before all these happened so it's kind of difficult to not exercise at all . I can't find anything from the medical communitty in my country (half of them tell me to visit a shrink-which i did [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/tongue.gif[/img]- and the other half tells me i have cfs ) so i wanted to give you some hints and maybe you can give me a clue . First of all , my thyroid numbers are supposed to be treated (TSH=7,35) and while i was on treatment i had tsh=2 and ft4,ft3 on high range but none of the symptoms resolved + i was going crazy . Whenever i exercise i can usually make it to the end but then i will have headaches,nausea for the next 3-4 days . Also i 've noticed (i 've been taking my temperatures) that whenever i exercise my body temperature goes down (!!!!!)
    I hope you can give me your lights because life is really hard with all these symptoms and exercise (even the minimum) would give me back hope ... and my job !!! thanks anyway

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    <div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (bodis10 @ May 29 2010, 11:01 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div><div class='quotemain'>Hello guys ,
    I hope i am writing in the right section of the forum . I 've been experiencing symptoms like unrefreshing sleep,fatigue,anxiety,brain fog and severe exercise intolerance for the past months ... To begin with , the only thing that the tests has shown was a hashimoto thyroiditis (active while i was making the tests) and some high cortisol values (especially in the evening,also some low dhea) . I tried to take t4 treatment but it ended up increasing my anxiety (panic attacks) so i stopped it . I am unable to perfom any aerobic activity and i can do minimum anaerobic exercise . Now before you jump on me , i was playing 2 sports before all these happened so it's kind of difficult to not exercise at all . I can't find anything from the medical communitty in my country (half of them tell me to visit a shrink-which i did [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/tongue.gif[/img]- and the other half tells me i have cfs ) so i wanted to give you some hints and maybe you can give me a clue . First of all , my thyroid numbers are supposed to be treated (TSH=7,35) and while i was on treatment i had tsh=2 and ft4,ft3 on high range but none of the symptoms resolved + i was going crazy . Whenever i exercise i can usually make it to the end but then i will have headaches,nausea for the next 3-4 days . Also i 've noticed (i 've been taking my temperatures) that whenever i exercise my body temperature goes down (!!!!!)
    I hope you can give me your lights because life is really hard with all these symptoms and exercise (even the minimum) would give me back hope ... and my job !!! thanks anyway</div>

    It's going to be hard to make a direct diagnosis with that information. What country are you in? What happened when you saw a psychiatrist? What events led to the development of this condition? Did it come on abruptly, or was it progressive?

    A few comments:

    -You need to get the thyroid issues taken care of. IIRC, Hashimoto's is an autoimmune disorder, which means by not treating the thyroid symptoms, you're likely exposing your body to a heightened state of inflammation. Moreover, inappropriately low thyroid function will lead to a host of other problems with time. However, existence of Hashimoto's also tends to predispose individuals to other autoimmune disorders (not directly, but by correlation, if that makes sense); have you been tested for autoimmune disease? More precisely, have your blood been tested for ANA (anti-nuclear antibodies)?

    -If you can't handle the anxiety while increasing thyroid dose, I would strongly consider adjunctive psycho-therapeutic medication in the meantime. SSRIs or benzodiazepines (e.g. alprazolam, or Xanax), might be a good temporary solution, but there does seem to be another underlying cause.

    -Several of your symptoms point to potential symptoms of depression, including poor sleep, fatigue, anxiety, brain fog, and poor response to stress. Have you experienced a loss of pleasure in activities? How's your appetite? Thyroid conditions can certainly cause depression, but this may be something you want to treat directly in the interim.

    -Yes, a CFS diagnosis is possible, but it's not one to jump for until other possibilities have been ruled out. I say this primary as there's not much that can be done for you if given a CFS diagnosis, simply because the disease is not well understood.

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    <div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (bodis10 @ May 29 2010, 10:01 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div><div class='quotemain'>Hello guys ,
    I hope i am writing in the right section of the forum . I 've been experiencing symptoms like unrefreshing sleep,fatigue,anxiety,brain fog and severe exercise intolerance for the past months ... To begin with , the only thing that the tests has shown was a hashimoto thyroiditis (active while i was making the tests) and some high cortisol values (especially in the evening,also some low dhea) . I tried to take t4 treatment but it ended up increasing my anxiety (panic attacks) so i stopped it . I am unable to perfom any aerobic activity and i can do minimum anaerobic exercise . Now before you jump on me , i was playing 2 sports before all these happened so it's kind of difficult to not exercise at all . I can't find anything from the medical communitty in my country (half of them tell me to visit a shrink-which i did [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/tongue.gif[/img]- and the other half tells me i have cfs ) so i wanted to give you some hints and maybe you can give me a clue . First of all , my thyroid numbers are supposed to be treated (TSH=7,35) and while i was on treatment i had tsh=2 and ft4,ft3 on high range but none of the symptoms resolved + i was going crazy . Whenever i exercise i can usually make it to the end but then i will have headaches,nausea for the next 3-4 days . Also i 've noticed (i 've been taking my temperatures) that whenever i exercise my body temperature goes down (!!!!!)
    I hope you can give me your lights because life is really hard with all these symptoms and exercise (even the minimum) would give me back hope ... and my job !!! thanks anyway</div>


    the ONLY thing that was tested for was Hashimoto's? Your body is destroying its thyroid and your worried about exercise intolerance? You need to take care of the hashimoto's. Likely you will need cortisol support as well. You need to get on either armour thyroid, or a t3/t4 combination and drive your tsh (ie your natural thyroid production) into the ground. Full suppression...so as to control the hashimoto's. A lot of people also look to iodine and/or ldn therapy for hashi's but both are a bit controversial.


    All the other signs point to adrenal/cortisol issues, but my guess is the hashi's is causing that. Get on thyroid meds to fix that....if you can't take the meds because of anxiety issues, it means you need cortisol as well, at least until you can handle the meds better. Its also usually best to slowly start on thyroid meds, but in your case with hashi's you need to get on a suppressive dose fast.

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    thanks for answering ,
    First of all , yes i have cortisol issues , but these would be i produce too much ... I have 25 in the morning and twice the highest lab value in the evening ... in fact this has dropped my dhea and testosterone levels lower than usual . Yes i care about exercise intolerance because not being able to exercise makes me unable to work and have fun ... and that's causing me psychological problems that's attacking my body worst than hashimoto's [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/tongue.gif[/img] ... i took the t4 treatment which dropped my tsh lower than 2 (before i stopped) and my ft4,ft3 in the highest range but i felt worst . There must be a reason don't you think?
    Ex dubio i believe you have great knowledge but i can't convince you that my psychological problems followed this situation ... If this counts , i eat five meals a day (without doing nothing) and whenever i feel "good" i exercise (and it hits me back every time lol) ... Now i was tottaly focused on my sports and my job and this situation seems like a "loss of identity" and this can create anxiety ... but i had panic attacks out of the bloom even when i thought i was just overtrained or overfatigued
    I have done a lot of blood tests but no ANA probably because i don't have any "new" symptoms ... don't you believe that there must be a reason for this anxiety ... i don't feel comfortable taking an ssri to treat t4 side effects ... it sounds to me like taking a very dangerous drug to treat the bad's of a "innocent" one . Keep in mind that stopping the T4 reduced my anxiety at once (not all of it)
    if you can think of something (especially the drop in temperature while working out is realy unique , or not ?) please let me know
    thanks for answering

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    Again...with Hashi's you need to drop TSH to 0. You need to suppress your natural thyroid production so it stops destroying your thyroid gland. I assume once that is taken care of, other things will fall into place. I understand the not being able to work, but Hashi's is a big deal. I mean, you are literally 'eating up your own thyroid. fix that first.

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    <div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (scottyo @ May 30 2010, 08:56 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div><div class='quotemain'>Again...with Hashi's you need to drop TSH to 0. You need to suppress your natural thyroid production so it stops destroying your thyroid gland. I assume once that is taken care of, other things will fall into place. I understand the not being able to work, but Hashi's is a big deal. I mean, you are literally 'eating up your own thyroid. fix that first.</div>
    my friend , i have to tell you that i was pretty sure that hashimoto was causing all of these even if my endo didn't think so ... and starting treatment was primary my proposal , not his . Now what i may not have declared is what i mention as "increased anxiety" . So by this i don't mean being anxious and not being able to calm down , but something like a phobia (haven't felt like that before) , like i am in danger - not being able to look at the sky , panic attacks whenever i left home , scared to be in open space and the worst was that i was waking up in the morning with rushing thoughts like i was going crazy . I stopped the treatment because i was scared , not because i believe my thyroid is fine . Nevertheless ,after stopping, running thoughts upon waking stopped froma day 1 and progressively all of my anxiety symptoms are gone (only general anxiety in the evening still happens) ...
    Of course my thyroid needs t4 ot t4/t3 , that's why i have tsh=7 ... the thing is that i needed then also and didn't work so it must be something else before the thyroid ... and it's not low cortisol . Any proposals ?
    i will try out thyroid treatment again but i want to know why it didn't work on the first place
    another hint in my blood tests are ferritine - vitamin d3 levels which rised from 45,26 to 80, 52 within a few months (without supplementation)

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    Looks like you need a new doc. Many endo's are terrible but you would think they would be able to at least treat Hashi's. Your tsh is 7 because your thyroid gland is going awol. You need thyroid meds not because the tsh is high, but because you need to fully suppress your tsh (i.e have your body completely stop producing its own thyroid hormones so that it will stop attacking the thyroid gland).

    My guess with the anxiety is that your body is over stressed, you likely need cortisol to help get the thyroid into the cells. Some people talk about "pooling" of t3/t4 (especially t4) from meds. This is why armour is generally better than t4. It happens when their is inadequate cortisol. I honestly don't know the science but I had the exact same feelings as you did even on 1/2 grain of armour thyroid (I'm on a much higher dose now). That was, until I added in sufficient cortisol to support my system. It seems like you really need to find a good doc, however. There are a few decent forums on the web to help, but a good doc is really your best bet.

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    I didn't read this all but have you checked you adrenal status?

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    <div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (simpllyhuge @ May 30 2010, 06:40 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div><div class='quotemain'>I didn't read this all but have you checked you adrenal status?</div>
    Yes my friend , one 4xsaliva test and several blood tests ...

    saliva test showed evening cortisol out of range (upper range) and dhea in range but low (morning+afternoon)

    Blood tests generally showed cortisol am 21-25 ng/dl (several readings) , dhea-s at 200 (several readings) and testosterone 1st reading at 400 and it's getting up (520 now)

    I don't seem to have cortisol issues (i produce a lot actually - stress?) which seems to dominates DHEA-Testosterone production ... Any ideas on low body temperature and droping more with physical activity ?

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    <div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (bodis10 @ May 30 2010, 08:37 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div><div class='quotemain'>Yes my friend , one 4xsaliva test and several blood tests ...

    saliva test showed evening cortisol out of range (upper range) and dhea in range but low (morning+afternoon)

    Blood tests generally showed cortisol am 21-25 ng/dl (several readings) , dhea-s at 200 (several readings) and testosterone 1st reading at 400 and it's getting up (520 now)

    I don't seem to have cortisol issues (i produce a lot actually - stress?) which seems to dominates DHEA-Testosterone production ... Any ideas on low body temperature and droping more with physical activity ?</div>


    I have a very similar situation. My cortisol shows normal but it almost seems like it not enough. I am also extremely stressed and tired and half asleep all morning and afternoon but then wide awake at night. I have had a doctor recently suggest transdermal Pregnenolone, I don't think people here are a fan thou. I also take 10mg of HC in the morning.

    I still don't really understand cortisols actions in the body, but was thinking in my case any maybe yours that the adrenals are over compensating for thyroid and have been doing a border line satisfactory job at it, just enough to making thyroid tests seem normal. This is just a guess and I really don't know much.

    I just reread this and realized you have an fucked up TSH and possible Has his, I have nodules but have not had antibody tests yet.

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    <div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (simpllyhuge @ Jun 4 2010, 09:13 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div><div class='quotemain'>I have a very similar situation. My cortisol shows normal but it almost seems like it not enough. I am also extremely stressed and tired and half asleep all morning and afternoon but then wide awake at night. I have had a doctor recently suggest transdermal Pregnenolone, I don't think people here are a fan thou. I also take 10mg of HC in the morning.

    I still don't really understand cortisols actions in the body, but was thinking in my case any maybe yours that the adrenals are over compensating for thyroid and have been doing a border line satisfactory job at it, just enough to making thyroid tests seem normal. This is just a guess and I really don't know much.

    I just reread this and realized you have an fucked up TSH and possible Has his, I have nodules but have not had antibody tests yet.</div>
    Too bad you have to get through all "this" as well ... yes , indeed , my thyroid have "issues" that i should be dealing with , but not being able to tolerate T4 medication seems like i should be adressing my "energy" somewhere else ... As far as Pregnenolone is concerned , although considered a steroid , it is told to supress the hpta axis even less than dhea - which is used a lot (i think so - i am not a doc)
    Well my main issue is exercise intolerance anyway - i am optimistic about the rest and my future ... it seems to me that lowering body temp while exercising somehow affects the mitochondrial or neurotransmitter signaling(it affects me for days after) ... Is it any science behind my "guess" anyone ?

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    WELL! Finally I've found someone with exactly the same symptoms as me:



    I have Hashi's. I have cortisol misregulation. I don't tolerate meds containing T4; they make my hypo symptoms worse. One of my symptoms is myofascial pain. It gets really severe even when I take dessicated thyroid. Straight T4 would be suicide for me.



    I have high cortisol that won't come down after exertion, and that seems to be the cause of my headaches/nausea/utter exhaustion. I did a 4X saliva test the day after a X-C ski jaunt, and it was through the roof. (I was in bed all day. I triggered it on purpose to find out what was going on.)



    In the months since you posted, have you found a way to get your cortisol down to normal? I'm with you on the exercise -- I want to go back to my normal activities! BTW, your low temperature is simply telling you that you've gone hypothyroid.



    I have not found any way to bring cortisol down enough to allow me to exercise in the ways I used to (all-day ski or hike, dance for hours on end). BUT if I take LOTS of Seriphos during and after exercise, it helps me to the point where I'm not bedridden the next day. Now I'm trying ADHS (by Biotics Research), which they claim is more effective at bringing high cortisol down.



    The other thing that has kept the headaches/nausea to a minimum is progesterone cream. (Yes, I was tested, and it was low. Yes, I'm female, but men need progesterone, too.) Since starting it, I haven't been bedridden once. I have to keep the exercise down to 60-90 minutes. And it's mild. The minute I start pushing it, I feel the cortisol overshoot start to happen. The first signal is feeling a tad spacey and getting fatigued and out of breath easily. And pounding heart.



    Read Jacob Teitelbaum (Fatigued to Fantastic). He explains that cortisol misregulation can happen when the hypothalamus is suppressed, and the hypothalamus requires good sleep in order to reset. You will find that you do indeed have some symptoms of CFS. He has some answers about what causes CFS. And some answers on how to get your hypothalamus functioning again.



    Now, about T4. If you are having problems converting T4 to T3, then T4 meds are the worst possible thing you can take. As you've experienced. stopthethyroidmadness.com has explanations you can read about this. I took the lab test they recommended, and my T3/RT3 ratio was low. Most likely you need to be on a T3 med. Read all about that on the T3 Forum (at stopthethyroidmadness).



    Also read Dr. Kharrazian (Why Do I Still Have Thyroid Symptoms? When My Lab Tests Are Normal). He explains how high cortisol can lead to Hashimoto's. His treatment protocol targets the immune system, and it includes deleting gluten from your diet, because the gluten molecule is so similar to the thyroid molecule that most people with Hashi's are allergic. The allergy exacerbates the high cortisol.



    I hope you're still around on this forum. I'd like to hear from you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by scottyo View Post
    Looks like you need a new doc. Many endo's are terrible but you would think they would be able to at least treat Hashi's. Your tsh is 7 because your thyroid gland is going awol. You need thyroid meds not because the tsh is high, but because you need to fully suppress your tsh (i.e have your body completely stop producing its own thyroid hormones so that it will stop attacking the thyroid gland).



    My guess with the anxiety is that your body is over stressed, you likely need cortisol to help get the thyroid into the cells. Some people talk about "pooling" of t3/t4 (especially t4) from meds. This is why armour is generally better than t4. It happens when their is inadequate cortisol. I honestly don't know the science but I had the exact same feelings as you did even on 1/2 grain of armour thyroid (I'm on a much higher dose now). That was, until I added in sufficient cortisol to support my system. It seems like you really need to find a good doc, however. There are a few decent forums on the web to help, but a good doc is really your best bet.


    Agreed that you need a new doc. In the US, unfortunately, they are inept at treating Hashi's. Especially inept when there is "pooling" of T3/T4 in the blood. It is pooling because it is not getting into the cells. It is not getting into the cells when cortisol is too high or too low. So while some folks need a little HC to get the thyroid meds to work for them, others need to lower their cortisol.



    Sadly, when T3/T4 are not getting into the cells, your lab values will be high, and your Doc will decide you are hyperthyroid and lower your dose. Your body temperature will be low if you are hypothyroid, but doctors here will ignore that if your T3 and T4 are high. It's a knee-jerk reaction they have.



    Just guessing here, but anxiety that comes on for no reason is often your adrenals misbehaving. They can only produce so much cortisol, and when they run out, they make adrenaline. Adrenaline can cause the symptoms you describe. When this occurs in the middle of the night, you wake up. Hypoglycemia is often the trigger. Do you have low blood sugar?

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    Can you cite anything in support of T3/T4 "pooling" in the blood and not getting into cells during both low and high cortisol conditions? That sounds a little pseudo-scientific to me.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tweety View Post
    Agreed that you need a new doc. In the US, unfortunately, they are inept at treating Hashi's. Especially inept when there is "pooling" of T3/T4 in the blood. It is pooling because it is not getting into the cells. It is not getting into the cells when cortisol is too high or too low. So while some folks need a little HC to get the thyroid meds to work for them, others need to lower their cortisol.


    There's no evidence that this occurs. The only evidence relating to a negative response to thyroid supplementation occurs in cases where either Hashimoto's is not effectively treated by exogenous thyroid therapy (due to excessive autoimmune activity) or where rT3 levels are inappropriately high. Cortisol modulates rT3 levels by inhibiting the conversion of T4 to T3, thereby shunting T4 to rT3 conversion. In no way are these effects related to an inability of T3 or T4 to enter cells; in fact, as both hormones are lipophillic, they can easily pass through cell membranes without a transporter. rT3 does, however, serve as a competitive antagonist at T3 receptor sites, thereby antagonizing the action of T3. This can be ameliorated by reducing stress levels and/or temporarily increasing T3 -- but not T4 -- supplementation. There is no such thing, however, as T3 or T4 "pooling" in serum. Also note that perturbed thyroid hormone levels -- particularly in relation to rT3 -- typically have nothing to do with Hashimoto's thyroiditis.




    Sadly, when T3/T4 are not getting into the cells, your lab values will be high, and your Doc will decide you are hyperthyroid and lower your dose. Your body temperature will be low if you are hypothyroid, but doctors here will ignore that if your T3 and T4 are high. It's a knee-jerk reaction they have.


    Only if the doctor fails to test rT3. If rT3 is high, then yes T3 is failing to exert effects typical of its apparent concentration and this can manifest as a lowered body temperature. If rT3 is not elevated and temperature is still low, the problem likely lies apart from the thyroid gland. Again, T3 and T4 never have trouble getting into cells, so the first comment above is incorrect.




    Just guessing here, but anxiety that comes on for no reason is often your adrenals misbehaving. They can only produce so much cortisol, and when they run out, they make adrenaline. Adrenaline can cause the symptoms you describe. When this occurs in the middle of the night, you wake up. Hypoglycemia is often the trigger. Do you have low blood sugar?


    And your guess is wrong. Anthropomorphizing the adrenal glands is getting very trite. The adrenals do not misbehave, become fatigued, or otherwise express human emotion. There is no known limit to the amount of cortisol they can produce unless there is a shortage of cholesterol, but cholesterol deficiency of an extent necessary to reduce cortisol production is essentially unheard of. Even if the adrenals did not run out of cortisol, they would not magically start producing epinephrine or norepinephrine in its place. In fact, different parts of the adrenals (cortex and medulla, respectively) produce cortisol and E/NE.



    Epinephrine is a response to hypoglycemia, not a cause; epinephrine increases glucose availability and is released during hypoglycemia to increase blood glucose levels. Midnight hypoglycemia consequent to inflammatory conditions or hypothyroidism certainly might wake you up, but the consequent increase in epinephrine is secondary to the hypoglycemia.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ex Dubio View Post
    There's no evidence that this occurs. The only evidence relating to a negative response to thyroid supplementation occurs in cases where either Hashimoto's is not effectively treated by exogenous thyroid therapy (due to excessive autoimmune activity) or where rT3 levels are inappropriately high. Cortisol modulates rT3 levels by inhibiting the conversion of T4 to T3, thereby shunting T4 to rT3 conversion. In no way are these effects related to an inability of T3 or T4 to enter cells; in fact, as both hormones are lipophillic, they can easily pass through cell membranes without a transporter. rT3 does, however, serve as a competitive antagonist at T3 receptor sites, thereby antagonizing the action of T3. This can be ameliorated by reducing stress levels and/or temporarily increasing T3 -- but not T4 -- supplementation. There is no such thing, however, as T3 or T4 "pooling" in serum. Also note that perturbed thyroid hormone levels -- particularly in relation to rT3 -- typically have nothing to do with Hashimoto's thyroiditis.







    Only if the doctor fails to test rT3. If rT3 is high, then yes T3 is failing to exert effects typical of its apparent concentration and this can manifest as a lowered body temperature. If rT3 is not elevated and temperature is still low, the problem likely lies apart from the thyroid gland. Again, T3 and T4 never have trouble getting into cells, so the first comment above is incorrect.







    And your guess is wrong. Anthropomorphizing the adrenal glands is getting very trite. The adrenals do not misbehave, become fatigued, or otherwise express human emotion. There is no known limit to the amount of cortisol they can produce unless there is a shortage of cholesterol, but cholesterol deficiency of an extent necessary to reduce cortisol production is essentially unheard of. Even if the adrenals did not run out of cortisol, they would not magically start producing epinephrine or norepinephrine in its place. In fact, different parts of the adrenals (cortex and medulla, respectively) produce cortisol and E/NE.



    Epinephrine is a response to hypoglycemia, not a cause; epinephrine increases glucose availability and is released during hypoglycemia to increase blood glucose levels. Midnight hypoglycemia consequent to inflammatory conditions or hypothyroidism certainly might wake you up, but the consequent increase in epinephrine is secondary to the hypoglycemia.
    Dubio, you're the best. Thumbs up for this post and a hurray on anti-anthropomorphizing
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    You guys are wrong, my thyroid gland expresses emotion. It would not go gently into that good night. It raged, raged against the dying of the light.
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    Oh, for cryin' out loud, Dubious, I'm not here to get ripped by someone. I'm also not here to help you. OF COURSE I meant the adrenals are being misregulated. I can make my writing style as academic as I choose to, but I don't usually choose to when I don't know the people I'm talking to.



    I would like to communicate with the person who started this thread about whether he/she has managed to deal with the exercise intolerance.



    This is the first post I've made on this M&M site. I bothered to make it because I found someone whose symptoms are practically identical to mine. For the first time in 18 years!



    I really don't care to communicate with you, Dubious, as long as you're being snide and superior. I don't have the energy for it. Take your excess nasty energy elsewhere.

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    Senior Member adreno's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tweety View Post
    Oh, for cryin' out loud, Dubious, I'm not here to get ripped by someone. I'm also not here to help you. OF COURSE I meant the adrenals are being misregulated. I can make my writing style as academic as I choose to, but I don't usually choose to when I don't know the people I'm talking to.



    I would like to communicate with the person who started this thread about whether he/she has managed to deal with the exercise intolerance.



    This is the first post I've made on this M&M site. I bothered to make it because I found someone whose symptoms are practically identical to mine. For the first time in 18 years!



    I really don't care to communicate with you, Dubious, as long as you're being snide and superior. I don't have the energy for it. Take your excess nasty energy elsewhere.


    If your symptoms have not improved in 18 years, could it be because your approach is wrong? I believe you should listen to what Ex Dubio is telling you, rather than the unscientific nonsense at stopthethyroidmadness, which is getting you nowhere.

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    Senior Member Ex Dubio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tweety View Post
    Oh, for cryin' out loud, Dubious, I'm not here to get ripped by someone. I'm also not here to help you. OF COURSE I meant the adrenals are being misregulated. I can make my writing style as academic as I choose to, but I don't usually choose to when I don't know the people I'm talking to.


    But I'm here to help the OP, and correcting your misinformation is in line with that goal. If you meant the adrenals are dysregulated, you failed to make that clear.




    I would like to communicate with the person who started this thread about whether he/she has managed to deal with the exercise intolerance.


    Yeah, me too. That's kinda the point.




    This is the first post I've made on this M&M site. I bothered to make it because I found someone whose symptoms are practically identical to mine. For the first time in 18 years!


    That's great; I'm not telling you not to post, but I felt it was important to clear up a few common misconceptions. My post was not intended as an attack on you personally.




    I really don't care to communicate with you, Dubious, as long as you're being snide and superior. I don't have the energy for it. Take your excess nasty energy elsewhere.


    You started the personal attacks, because you can't admit to being wrong. That's simply not my problem, and I will continue to post as I damn well please.

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