Prohormones: Superdrol

Superdrol is also known as methyldrostanolone, methasterone, and methasteron. Superdrol is an anabolic steroid that was investigated, but never actually used for medical purposes. In 2005, Anabolic Xtreme first brought superdrol to the supplement market as the main ingredient in their product “Superdrol”.

Superdrol is not a pro-hormone or pro-steroid, it is an orally active anabolic steroid. With a Q-ratio of 20, it is known to be about 400% as anabolic as methyl-test while being only about 20% as androgenic. Superdrol does not aromatise to estrogen and it is also an inhibitor of 11b-hydroxylase. The combination of these two produces a dry look (less water retained under the skin) paired with full muscles due to intramuscular (within the muscle) water retention. Superdrol is also known to produce shocking gains in strength within a very short period of time.

As with any anabolic steroid, superdrol has side effects. Due to the fact that superdrol does not aromatise, bloating should be minimal and cases of gynecomastia are not common. Because of the low androgenic activity of superdrol, androgenic side effects such as hair loss, acne, and increased body hair should be minimal. Side effects typically associated with superdrol are muscle cramping, painful back pumps, lethargy, increased cholesterol levels, and liver stress. Solid liver support is a must with superdrol, as it is a di-methylated oral steroid and has been cited in medical texts multiple times to cause hepatotoxicity. (3, 4, 5, 6)

The typical dosage for superdrol is 10-20 mg per day in two divided doses. Cycles are typically 3-4 weeks in length, because of the liver toxicity of superdrol and also because it seems to lose its effects after the third week of use.

References

1. Van Eenoo P, & Delbeke FT. (2006). Metabolism and excretion of anabolic steroids in doping control–new steroids and new insights. The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. 101(4-5), 161-78.

2. Julius A. Vida. (1969). Androgens and Anabolic Agents: Chemistry and Pharmacology. New York: Academic Press. 23 & 168.

3. Singh V, Rudraraju M, Carey EJ, Byrne TJ, Vargas HE, Williams JE, Balan V, Douglas DD, & Rakela J. (2009). Severe hepatotoxicity caused by a methasteron-containing performance-enhancing supplement. Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology. 43(3), 287.

4. Nasr J, & Ahmad J. (2009). Severe cholestasis and renal failure associated with the use of the designer steroid Superdrol (methasteron): a case report and literature review. Digestive Diseases and Sciences. 54(5), 1144-6.

5. Shah NL, Zacharias I, Khettry U, Afdhal N, & Gordon FD. (2008). Methasteron-associated cholestatic liver injury: clinicopathologic findings in 5 cases. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology : the Official Clinical Practice Journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. 6(2), 255-8.

6. Jasiurkowski B, Raj J, Wisinger D, Carlson R, Zou L, & Nadir A. (2006). Cholestatic jaundice and IgA nephropathy induced by OTC muscle building agent superdrol. The American Journal of Gastroenterology. 101(11), 2659-62.

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